More exciting Fantasy and Science Fiction novels

A Sellsword’s Compassion By Jacob Peppers

A Sellsword’s Compassion is Book One of The Seven Virtues by Jacob Peppers. It takes place in a War torn land as the sons and daughters of the late King Marcus battle over who will claim their father’s throne and able-bodied men and women flock to one cause or the other in the hopes of a better tomorrow. At least, most of them. If life has taught the jaded sellsword, Aaron Envelar, anything, it’s that hope is for fools and causes are a sure remedy for breathing.

However his latest job leads him to the corpse of a prince and a conspiracy that threatens to destroy the entire realm, Aaron is forced to choose sides in a war he doesn’t want, between forces he doesn’t understand. Thrust into a world of mythical assassins, a madman with a superhuman strength, and a nagging ball of light with a superiority complex who claims to be the embodiment of compassion, Aaron takes on his hardest job yet—staying alive.

Benjamin Ashwood by AC Cobble

Set Against the backdrop of warring political, economic, and military factions, Benjamin Ashwood is book one in an engaging fantasy adventure, series by A.C.Cobble which is Packed full of action and adventure. It features Young Benjamin who starts off as your typical orphan in a small farming town. Life is simple in Ben’s village until an unexpected attack brings the arrival of exciting strangers.

Before Ben understands what is happening, they’ve recruited his sister to go with them on an adventure to the big city where his sister enrols as a pupil at the all-female magic school. To ensure her safety, Ben accompanies her among company of mysterious swordsmen and magic-users. At the city Benjamin starts brewing beer for a living,

This goes well until he gets involved in politics of the dangerous kind and discovers that the city is ruled by unscrupulous leaders and he finds himself in a more dangerous world than he ever imagined. Mages, demons, thieves, and assassins are just a few of the perils he faces on an epic journey to a city shrouded in myth and legend. Ben and his friends end up battling a threat to all of mankind and Benjamin must decide whether to flee or stand up to them…

Trilisk Ruins Michael McCloskey

The Trilisk Ruins is the first book in the PIT series by Michael McCloskey. They feature a character named Telisa Relachik who studied to be a xenoarchaeologist in a future where humans have found alien artifacts but haven’t ever encountered live aliens. Then she discovers an Ancient race of cephalopod like aliens called Trilisk. Of all the aliens whose extinct civilizations are investigated, the Trilisks are the most advanced and the most mysterious.

Telisa refuses to join the government because of her opposition to its hard-handed policies restricting civilian investigation and trade of alien artifacts, despite the fact that her estranged father is a captain in the United Nations Space Force. However When a group of artifact smugglers recruits her, she can’t pass up the chance at getting her hands on objects that could advance her life’s work. But she soon learns her expectations of excitement and riches come with serious drawbacks as she ends up fighting for her life on a mysterious alien planet.

Valley of Embers (The Landkist Saga Book 1) by Steven Kelliher

Valley of Embers is book one of five in the epic fast-paced Landkist fantasy series by Steven Keliher. It is set in the mythical realm of Landkist where For hundreds of years, the flame-wielding Embers have been the last line of defense against the nightmare creatures from the World Apart, but the attacks are getting worse. Kole Reyna and his guards Protect Last Lake from the terrors of the night. They are the Last Line of defence, and he fears for his people’s future.

Then Kole is wounded by a demon unlike any they have seen before, and the Emberfolk believe it is a sign of an ancient enemy returned, a powerful Sage known as the Eastern Dark. Soon the besieged inhabitants of the Valley of Embers are one of only a handful of walled towns remaining as the last bastions against the night, and the dwindling population of Emberfolk struggle to defend their secluded homes from the Dark Kind. Kole has never trusted in prophecy, but with his people hanging on the precipice, he reluctantly agrees to lead the Valley’s greatest warriors in a last desperate bid for survival. They must risk everything in search of a former ally long-thought dead, to help them, and whether Kole trusts him or not, he may be the only one capable of saving them.

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Jack the Giant Slayer

I have recently watched the exciting Fantasy Film Jack the Giant Slayer. It is Based on the fairy tale Jack and the Beanstalk and takes place In the Kingdom of Cloister, where Jack, a young farm boy, becomes fascinated by the legend of Erik, an ancient king who defeated an army of invading giants from a realm in the sky by controlling them with a magic crown. At the same time, Princess Isabelle becomes fascinated with the same legend.

Ten years later, Jack goes into town to sell his horse to support his uncle’s farm. There, Jack spots Isabelle and becomes enamored with her after defending her honor from a group of hooligans. Meanwhile, Lord Roderick returns to his study, only to find that a monk has robbed him. The monk offers Jack some magic beans he stole from Roderick as collateral for Jack’s horse. Back at the castle, Isabelle quarrels with her father King Brahmwell as she wants to explore the kingdom, but he wants her to stay and marry Roderick. Likewise, Jack’s uncle scolds him for being foolish before throwing the beans on the floor and leaving the house. Determined to be free, Isabelle sneaks out of the castle and seeks shelter from the rain in Jack’s house. As it rains, one of the beans takes root and grows into a massive beanstalk that carries the house and Isabelle into the sky as Jack falls to the ground.

Jack, Roderick, and Roderick’s attendant Wicke volunteer to join the king’s knights, led by Elmont and his second in-command, Crawe, and climb the beanstalk in search of Isabelle. As they climb, Roderick and Wicke cut the safety rope, intentionally killing some of the knights. At the top, they discover the giants’ realm and decide to split into two groups: one with Jack, Elmont, and Crawe, and the other including Roderick and Wicke, but not before Roderick forcibly takes the remaining beans from Jack (although Jack manages to save one for himself). Jack’s group is trapped by a giant, who takes everyone prisoner except Jack. Meanwhile, Roderick’s group encounters two other giants; one eats Wicke, but before he can eat Roderick, Roderick dons the magical crown.

Jack follows the giant to their stronghold, the two-headed giant leader, Fallon, kills Crawe. Jack finds Isabelle and Elmont imprisoned there. As the giants prepare to kill their remaining prisoners, Roderick walks in and enslaves the giants with the crown. He incites the giants to attack Cloister at dawn and gives them permission to eat Isabelle and Elmont. However Jack rescues Isabelle and Elmont as one of the giants prepares to cook Elmont as a pig-in-a-blanket. The trio makes for the beanstalk where the giant guarding the beanstalk is pushed off the realm’s edge. Seeing the giant’s body, Brahmwell is understandably alarmed and orders the beanstalk cut down to avoid an invasion by the giants.

Jack and Isabelle head down the beanstalk, while Elmont stays to confront Roderick however Fallon takes the crown and Elmont is forced to escape down the beanstalk. Jack, Isabelle, and Elmont all survive the fall after the beanstalk is cut down. As everyone returns home, Jack warns that the giants are using Roderick’s beans to create beanstalks to descend down to Earth and attack Cloister. The giants lay siege to the castle and chase Jack, Isabelle, and Brahmwell inside, where Elmont fills the moat with oil and sets it on fire. Fallon falls in the moat and breaks into the castle from below. As the siege continues, Fallon captures Jack and Isabelle, and it id up to Jack to recover the Crown and the beans and banish the Giants to their own realm in an exciting finale.

Mage Slave by R.K.Thorne

I would also like to read the exciting fantasy adventure Mage Slave by R. K. Thorne. Mage Slave is the first novel in the Enslaved Chronicles trilogy and the novel is an epic tale of swords and sorcery with a side of romance. It features A warrior prince, an enslaved mage, whose destinies are both caught up in Magic, politics, love,  fate and a villainous plot to draw the world to war.

It concerns Crown Prince Aven Lanuken a noble but naive prince, who wants something more than a trophy for a future wife. He wants a woman who will be more friend than follower. A queen who will be more warrior than diplomat. He wants a partner he can trust… with a dangerous secret that’s kept him trapped in a dark mountain fortress his entire life.

Meanwhile a fierce and angry, Mage slave named Miara wants something more, too—to find an enemy prince. And not to marry him. She’s just received orders for her very first kidnapping. She loathes the idea of it, and it’s probably a suicide mission. But she has never failed a mission before and doesn’t intend to start now. However something unexpected happens on her latest mission,  Of all the women in the world, why does Aven Lanuken have to fall for this one ?

Through the Never: a Science Fiction and Fantasy Collection

Through the Never is a thrilling Fantasy and Science Fiction Anthology by many different authors including J.A. Culican (Author), Brandon Barr, Tina Glasneck, Sarah K. L. Wilson, JC Kan”, R. L. Blalock, Craig Martelle, Debbie Cassidy, Richard Amos and Sharolyn G. Brown. It features fourteen exciting adventures in science fiction and fantasy featuring epic quests, Magic and and heart-pounding adventuress set in dangerous unknown new worlds, far-off galaxies and fantastic new realms

Among the stories in this collection is Dragon’s Awakening: Journey to Asgard by Tina Glasneck. This is part of Glasneck’s Dragons series and introduces a few fun Norse Gods. The story follows Norse God Baldr when he whisks away Nanna, a human, from evil in her time and takes her to Asgard. Baldr loves Nanna without hesitation and couldn’t leave her to die in her time, but Nanna is wary and must learn what it means to love someone and let them in. Their love will be tested by many in Asgard.

The second story The Fall of Endurance by R.L. Blalock, features a character named Laure who is one of many traveling in space looking for new home to start a new life to keep humans from becoming extinct. However they run into debris and have to land the ship quickly. When they land on this new planet which they hope will be their new home they run into a lot more than they were hoping for

The third story The Outcast by Craig Martelle features a prisoner who As part of his punishment is sent out in a spaceship to survey asteroids. All he has for companionship is the voice of the computer The ending was out of this world.

The fourth story Across the Starlight Blue by Debbie Cassidy and Richard Amos is a short science fiction story about A spaceship which is traveling through space looking for a new home when it is hit by debris and has to land quickly. After taking the shuttles to their new planet they are attacked by these alien bird like creatures upon entering the planet’s atmosphere. Will they survive the attack? Can they make this new planet their home? Or have they traveled all this way for nothing?

The fifth story Rodan’s Awakening by Sharolyn G. Brown features A young girl named Rodan whose home is attacked and her whole family is lost. So Rodan embarks on a journey to find the ones who attacked her home and make them pay.

Jonathan Swift (Gullivers Travels)

Satirist, essayist, poet and cleric Jonathan Swift sadly passed away on 19 October 1745 (aged 77), shortly after having a stroke. He was born 30 November 1667. He is remembered for works such as Gulliver’s Travels, A Modest Proposal, A Journal to Stella, Drapier’s Letters, The Battle of the Books, An Argument Against Abolishing Christianity, and A Tale of a Tub. Swift’s family had several interesting literary connections: His grandmother, Elizabeth (Dryden) Swift, was the niece of Sir Erasmus Dryden, grandfather of the poet John Dryden. The same grandmother’s aunt, Katherine (Throckmorton) Dryden, was a first cousin of Elizabeth, wife of Sir Walter Raleigh. His great-great grandmother, Margaret (Godwin) Swift, was the sister of Francis Godwin, author of The Man in the Moone which influenced parts of Swift’s Gulliver’s Travels. His uncle, Thomas Swift, married a daughter of the poet and playwright Sir William Davenant, a godson of William Shakespeare. He is probably the foremost prose satirist in the English language, and is less well known for his poetry. Swift originally published all of his works under pseudonyms – such as Lemuel Gulliver, Isaac Bickerstaff, MB Drapier – or anonymously. He is also known for being a master of two styles of satire: the Horatian and Juvenalian styles.

In February 1702, Swift received his Doctor of Divinity degree from Trinity College, Dublin. He then traveled to England and returned to Ireland in October, accompanied by Esther Johnson and his friend Rebecca Dingley, another member of William Temple’s household. During his visits to England in these years Swift published A Tale of a Tub and The Battle of the Books (1704) and began to gain a reputation as a writer. This led to close, lifelong friendships with Alexander Pope, John Gay, and John Arbuthnot, forming the core of the Martinus Scriblerus Club. Swift also went to London many times & was recruited by The Tory Party to support their cause as editor of The Examiner. In 1711, Swift published the political pamphlet “The Conduct of the Allies & became part of the inner circle of the Tory government, and often acted as mediator between Henry St John (Viscount Bolingbroke) the secretary of state for foreign affairs (1710–15) and Robert Harley (Earl of Oxford) lord treasurer and prime minister (1711–14).

After the death of Queen Anne in 1714 and accession of George I, the Tory leaders were tried for treason for conducting secret negotiations with France so Swift returned to Ireland, where he began to support of Irish causes, producing some of his most memorable works: Proposal for Universal Use of Irish Manufacture (1720), Drapier’s Letters (1724), and A Modest Proposal (1729), earning him the status of an Irish patriot. He began writing Travels into Several Remote Nations of the World, in Four Parts, by Lemuel Gulliver, first a surgeon, and then a captain of several ships, better known as Gulliver’s Travels.

In 1726 he visited London, staying with his old friends Alexander Pope, John Arbuthnot and John Gay, who helped him arrange for the anonymous publication of Gulliver’s Travels in 1726 It was immediately successful and was translated into. French, German, and Dutch.Swift returned to England one more time in 1727 but The visit was cut short when Swift received word that Esther Johnson was dying and rushed back home to be with her. On 28 January 1728, Esther Johnson died. Sadly After this, Death became a frequent feature in Swift’s life. In 1731 he wrote Verses on the Death of Dr. Swift. In 1738 Swift began to show signs of illness, and in 1742 he may have suffered a stroke, losing the ability to speak. Following his death he was buried in his own cathedral by Esther Johnson’s side, in accordance with his wishes. The bulk of his fortune (twelve thousand pounds) was left to found a hospital for the mentally ill, which opened in 1757. There have also been many film Animation and Television adaptations made of of the novel. including the 1939 version, a Hallmark version starring Ted Danson as Lemuel Gulliver, and the most recent one starring Jack Black.

Philip Pullman

English novelist Philip Pullman CBE, FRSL was born 19 October 1946. He is the author of several best-selling books, most notably the fantasy trilogy His Dark Materials, The Ruby in the Smoke and the fictionalised biography of Jesus, The Good Man Jesus and the Scoundrel Christ. In the 1950′s After his Father’s tragic Death in an Air Accident, His mother remarried and moved to Australia, where Pullman’s discovered comic books including Superman and Batman. Around 1957 Pullman also discovered John Milton’s Paradise Lost, which would become a major influence for His Dark Materials.After returning to England From, Pullman attended Exeter College, Oxford, from 1963, receiving a Third class BA in 1968. He also discovered William Blake’s illustrations around 1970, which would later influence him greatlyIn 1970 he began teaching middle school children ages 9 to 13 at Bishop Kirk Middle School in Summertown, North Oxford and writing school plays. His first published work was The Haunted Storm, which joint-won the New English Library’s Young Writer’s Award in 1972. Galatea, an adult fantasy-fiction novel, followed in 1978, but it was his school plays which inspired his first children’s book, Count Karlstein, in 1982.

He stopped teaching around the publication of The Ruby in the Smoke (1986), his second children’s book, whose Victorian setting is indicative of Pullman’s interest in that era. Pullman also taught part-time at Westminster College, Oxford, between 1988 and 1996, continuing to write children’s stories.Around 1993 He began writing the trilogy His Dark Materials, and Volume I, Northern Lights was published in 1995 (entitled The Golden Compass in the U.S., 1996). The next two novels in the trilogy, The Subtle Knife and The Amber Spyglass, soon followed. Northern Lights won the Carnegie Medal for children’s fiction in the UK in 1995. The Amber Spyglass was awarded both 2001 Whitbread Prize for best children’s book and the Whitbread Book of the Year prize in January 2002, For the 70th anniversary of the Medal it was named one of the top ten winning works by a panel, composing the ballot for a public election of the all-time favourite and became the first children’s book to receive that award. Northern Lights was also named the all-time “Carnegie of Carnegies” on 21 June 2007. The series was also placed third in the BBC’s Big Read poll, and also won the Guardian Children’s Fiction Prize.

On 23 November 2007, Pullman was made an honorary professor at Bangor University and In June 2008, he became a Fellow supporting the MA in Creative Writing at Oxford Brookes Universitys and In 2008, The Times also named Pullman one of the “50 greatest British writers since 1945″. Pullman later wrote two companion pieces to the trilogy, entitled Lyra’s Oxford, and Once Upon a Time in the North. A third companion piece Pullman refers to as the “green book” will expand upon his character Will. He has plans for one more, the as-yet-unpublished The Book of Dust. This book is not a continuation of the trilogy but will include characters and events from His Dark Materials, he is also writing “The Adventures of John Blake”, a story for the British children’s comic The DFC, with artist John Aggs. The Golden Compass was also adapted as a film starring Daniel Craig and Nicole Kidman, and the Ruby in the Smoke was adapted into a Television Drama starring Billie Piper.

In October 2009, he became a patron of the Palestine Festival of Literature, and continues to deliver talks and writes occasionally for The Guardian. He was awarded a CBE in the New Year’s Honours list in 2004. He also co-judged the prestigious Christopher Tower Poetry Prize (awarded by Oxford University) in 2005 with Gillian Clarke. Pullman also began lecturing at a seminar in English at his alma mater, Exeter College, Oxford, in 2004, the same year that he was elected President of the Blake Society. In 2004 Pullman also guest-edited The Mays Anthology, a collection of new writing from students at the University of Oxford and University of Cambridge. In 2005 Pullman won the biggest prize in children’s literature, the Astrid Lindgren Memorial Award from the Swedish Arts Council, recognising his career contribution to “children’s and young adult literature in the broadest sense”.

The first volume of Pullman’s new trilogy The Book of Dust is published on 19 October 2017. The as-yet-unnamed second title in “The Book of Dust” will include a character named after Nur Huda el-Wahabi, a 16-year-old victim of London’s tragic Grenfell Tower fire.

The Lion, the Witch and the wardrobe

The first book in the Chronicles of Narnia series “The Lion, the Witch and the Wardrobe” was published by C.S. Lewis on October 16 1950. It starts In 1940, with four siblings – Peter, Susan, Edmund, and Lucy Pevensie – being evacuated from London during World War II to escape the Blitz. They are sent to the countryside to live with professor Digory Kirke. Exploring the professor’s house, Lucy finds a wardrobe which doubles as a magic portal to a forest in a mythical land called Narnia which has been plunged into a permanent deep winter by an evil White Witch called “Jadis” for 100 years.

In Narnia Lucy meets Tumnus, a faun, who invites her to tea in his home. There the faun confesses that he invited her not out of hospitality, but with the intention of betraying her to the White Witch. The witch has ruled Narnia for years, using magic to keep it frozen in a perpetual winter. She has ordered all Narnians to turn in any humans (“Sons of Adam” or “Daughters of Eve”) they come across. But now that he has come to know and like a human, Tumnus decides to escort Lucy back to the lamppost instead. Lucy returns through the wardrobe and finds that only a few seconds have passed in normal time during her absence. Her siblings do not believe her story about another world inside the wardrobe, which is now found to have a solid back panel.

During a game of hide-and-seek on some days later, Lucy again passes into Narnia. This time her brother Edmund follows her and he meets Jadis, who calls herself Queen of Narnia. When she learns that he is human and has two sisters and a brother, she places an enchantment on him. She urges him to bring his siblings to her castle, promising in return to make him her heir. When Lucy and Edmund return together through the wardrobe, Edmund realizes that the queen he met and the witch Lucy describes are one and the same. He denies to the others that he has been in Narnia at all. Peter and Susan are puzzled by Lucy’s insistence, and consult the Professor.

Soon afterward, all four children enter Narnia together after hiding in the wardrobe to avoid the professor’s dour housekeeper, Mrs. Macready. Remembering the winter cold ahead, they take coats from the wardrobe before exploring. Lucy guides them to Tumnus’s cave, but they find it ransacked, with a notice from Jadis (the White Witch) proclaiming his arrest for harbouring humans. A talking beaver intercepts them, proves himself a friend, and hides the children in his den. There, he and Mrs. Beaver tell them of a prophecy that Jadis’s power will fail when two Sons of Adam and two Daughters of Eve fill the four thrones at Cair Paravel. Aslan, the great lion and the rightful King, has been absent for many years but is now “on the move again” in Narnia. Edmund steals away to Jadis’s castle, which is filled with statues of Narnian victims she has turned to stone. Jadis is furious when Edmund appears alone and angrier still to learn that Aslan may have returned. She takes him on her sledge to catch the others or to reach Aslan’s court before them.

Meanwhile, Mr Beaver realises that Edmund has betrayed them, and they set off at once to seek Aslan at the Stone Table. As they travel, the Witch’s spell over Narnia begins to break: Father Christmas (who has not been seen in Narnia for a hundred years) arrives with magical presents: a sword for Peter, a horn and a bow with arrows for Susan, a knife and a bottle of healing cordial for Lucy. The snow starts to thaw. Aslan welcomes the children and the Beavers to his camp near the Stone Table. Upon hearing Edmund’s situation, he orders a rescue party of loyal Narnians.
Despite his treachery, Edmund is eventually rescued and reunited with his siblings. Jadis approaches in truce to parley with Aslan. She insists that, according to “deep magic from the dawn of time”, she holds the right to kill Edmund following his treason. So Aslan makes a deal with Jadis. That evening, Aslan secretly returns to the Stone Table, shadowed by Susan and Lucy Who discover that He has traded his own life to the witch in order to save Edmund’s, with tragic results.

Confident now of victory, Jadis the White Witch, leads her army away to battle. However things are not what they seem, The Stone Table breaks and Aslan is revived because of “deeper magic from before the dawn of time” which resurrects an innocent killed in place of a traitor. Aslan, Susan and Lucy travel to Jadis’s Castle to rescue everyone who has been turned to stone by Jadis. Meanwhile, Peter and Edmund lead the Narnians against Jadis, however Edmund is seriously wounded. Then Aslan arrives with the former statues as reinforcements. Then Aslan, Edmund, Susan, Peter and Lucy all lead the Narnians in an exciting Battle against Jadis and the forces of evil…