International and National events happening 12 July

  • Simplicity Day
  • Different Colored Eyes Day
  • Pecan Pie Day
  • Night of Nights

Simplicity Day commemorates the birth of American essayist, transcendentalist, poet, and cabin-in-the-woods philosopher Henry David Thoreau who was born on 12 July 1817. Throughout his life Thoreau published more than twenty volumes of books, articles, essays, journals, and poetry and he is best known for his book Walden, a reflection upon simple living in natural surroundings, and his essay “Civil Disobedience” (originally published as “Resistance to Civil Government”), an argument for disobedience to an unjust state.

Among his other lasting contributions are his writings on natural history and philosophy, in which he anticipated the methods and findings of ecology and environmental history, two sources of modern-day environmentalism. His literary style interweaves close observation of nature, personal experience, pointed rhetoric, symbolic meanings, and historical lore, while displaying a poetic sensibility, philosophical austerity, and Yankee attention to practical detail He was also deeply interested in the idea of survival in the face of hostile elements, historical change, and natural decay; at the same time he advocated abandoning waste and illusion in order to discover life’s true essential needs.

He was a lifelong abolitionist, delivering lectures that attacked the Fugitive Slave Law while praising the writings of Wendell Phillips and defending the abolitionist John Brown. Thoreau’s philosophy of civil disobedience later influenced the political thoughts and actions of such notable figures as Leo Tolstoy, Mahatma Gandhi, and Martin Luther King Jr.

Thoreau is sometimes referred to as an anarchist. His “Civil Disobedience” seems to call for improving rather than abolishing government—”I ask for, not at once no government, but at once a better government the direction of this improvement contrarily points toward anarchism: “‘That government is best which governs not at all;’ and when men are prepared for it, that will be the kind of government which they will have. Thoreau sadly died on May 6, 1862 However he influenced many people and his works have made a lasting impression.

Sir Arthur Conan Doyle

Scottish physician and prolific novelist Sir Arthur Conan Doyle sadly passed away on 7 July 1930. after having a heart attack at the age of 71. His last words were directed toward his wife: “You are wonderful.” The epitaph on his gravestone in the churchyard reads, in part: “Steel true/Blade straight/Arthur Conan Doyle/Knight/Patriot, Physician, and man of letters”. A statue honours Conan Doyle at Crowborough Cross in Crowborough, where he lived for 23 years and There is also a statue of Sherlock Holmes in Picardy Place, Edinburgh, close to the house where Conan Doyle was born.

He was born at 11 Picardy Place, Edinburgh, Scotland and was sent to the Roman Catholic Jesuit preparatory school Hodder Place, Stonyhurst, at the age of nine (1868-1870). He then went on to Stonyhurst College until 1875. From 1875 to 1876 he was educated at the Jesuit school Stella Matutina in Feldkirch, Austria. From 1876 to 1881 he studied medicine at the University of Edinburgh, including periods working in Aston in Birmingham, Sheffield and Ruyton-XI-Towns in Shropshire .While studying, Conan Doyle began writing short stories. His earliest extant fiction, “The Haunted Grange of Goresthorpe”, was unsuccessfully submitted to Blackwood’s Magazine. His first published piece “The Mystery of Sasassa Valley”, a story set in South Africa, was printed in Chambers’s Edinburgh Journal on 6 September 1879. Later that month, on 20 September, he also published his first non-fictional article, “Gelsemium as a Poison” in the British Medical Journal.

In 1882 he joined a former classmate at a medical practice in Plymouth, but Conan Doyle soon left to set up an independent practice. Arriving in Portsmouth in June of that year, he set up a medical practice in Southsea, and While waiting for patients, Conan Doyle again began writing stories and composed his first novels, The Mystery of Cloomber, not published until 1888, and the unfinished Narrative of John Smith, which would go unpublished until 2011. He amassed a portfolio of short stories including “The Captain of the Pole-Star” and “J. Habakuk Jephson’s Statement”, both inspired by Doyle’s time at sea.His first significant piece, A Study in Scarlet, appeared later that year in the Beeton’s Christmas Annual and received good reviews. The story featured the first appearance of Dr Watson and Sherlock Holmes. A sequel to A Study in Scarlet called The Sign of the Four appeared in Lippincott’s Magazine in February 1890. Conan Doyle then went on to write many more Sherlock Holmes short stories including A Scandal in Bohemia, A Case of identity, The Red Headed league, The Boscombe Valley Mystery, The Man wth the Twisted Lip and The Five Orange Pips

In 1890 after studying ophthalmology in Vienna, Conan Doyle moved to London, first living in Montague Place and then in South Norwood. He set up a practice as an ophthalmologist. He wrote in his autobiography that not a single patient crossed his door. This gave him more time for writing, and in November 1891 he wrote to his mother: “I think of slaying Holmes… and winding him up for good and all. He takes my mind from better things.” His mother responded, “You won’t! You can’t! You mustn’t!” In December 1893, in order to dedicate more of his time to what he considered his more important works (his historical novels), Conan Doyle had Holmes and Professor Moriarty apparently plunge to their deaths together down the Reichenbach Falls in the story “The Final Problem”. However the subsequent Public outcry, led him to bring the character back in 1901, in The Hound of the Baskervilles, though this was set at a time before the Reichenbach incident. In 1903, Conan Doyle published his first Holmes short story in ten years, “The Adventure of the Empty House”, in which it was explained that only Moriarty had fallen; but since Holmes had other dangerous enemies—especially Colonel Sebastian Moran—he had arranged to also be perceived as dead.

During his life Arthur Conan Doyle was a prolific writer whose other works include science fiction stories, plays, romances, poetry, non-fiction and historical novelS, his detective Sherlock Holmes, is generally considered a milestone in the field of crime fiction, And ultimately was featured in a total of 56 short stories and four Conan Doyle novels. Sherlock Holmes has since appeared in many novels and stories by other authors including The Silk House and Moriaty by Anthony Horowitz. ‘The Final Problem’ was published in 1913 and ‘The Valley of Fear’ was serialised in 1914. Many Sherlock Holmes novels have also been adapted for screen and Television, with Basil Rathbone, Ian Richardson, Peter Cushing and Robert Downey Junior among others, playing the role of Sherlock Holmes


Ringo Starr

English drummer, singer, songwriter, and actor Ringo Starr (Richard Starkey,) MBE was born 7 July 1940 in Dingle, Liverpool. In 1944, his family moved to 10 Admiral Grove; and soon afterwards, his parents separated, and divorced within the year. At age six Starkey developed appendicitis. Following a routine appendectomy he contracted peritonitis, causing him to fall into a coma that lasted for three days. His recovery took twelve months, which he spent away from his family at Liverpool’s Myrtle Street Children’s hospital.

Upon his discharge in May 1948, his mother allowed him to stay home, causing him to miss school. At age eight, he remained illiterate, with a poor grasp of mathematics and his lack of education contributed to a feeling of alienation at school, and he regularly played truant at Sefton Park. However After several years of twice weekly tutoring Starkey had nearly caught up. However in 1953, he contracted tuberculosis and was admitted to a sanatorium, where he remained for the next two years. During his stay the medical staff made an effort to stimulate motor activity and relieve boredom by encouraging their patients to join the hospital band, leading to his first exposure to a percussion instrument; a makeshift mallet made from a cotton bobbin that he used to strike the cabinets next to his bed. Starkey grew increasingly interested in drumming, receiving a copy of the Alyn Ainsworth song “Bedtime for Drums”. Starr said My grandparents gave me a mandolin and a banjo, but I didn’t want them. My grandfather gave me a harmonica … we had a piano but I only wanted to play the drums.

Starkey attended St Silas, a Church of England primary school near his house where his classmates nicknamed him “Lazarus”, and later Dingle Vale Secondary modern school, where he showed an aptitude for art, drama and mechanics. As a result of the prolonged hospitalisations, he fell behind his peers scholastically and was ineligible for the 11-plus qualifying examination required for attendance at a grammar school. Starkey then became interested in recordings by Dinah Shore, Sarah Vaughan and Billy Daniels from his mother’s second husband Harry Graves who was an impassioned fan of big band music and their vocalists. Then After another extended hospital stay following Starkey’s recovery from tuberculosis, he did not return to school, preferring instead to stay at home and listen to music while playing along by beating biscuit tins with sticks.

After his return home from the sanatorium in late 1955, Starkey entered the UK workforce in 1955, he worked at British Rail before securing an apprenticeship at a Liverpool equipment manufacturer. , but lacking motivation and discipline, his initial attempts at gainful employment proved unsuccessful. In an effort to secure himself some warm clothes, he briefly held a position at British Rail, who supplied their employees with suits. They gave him a hat, but no uniform, and unable to pass the physical examination, he was laid off and granted unemployment benefits.He then found work as a waiter serving drinks on a day boat that travelled from Liverpool to North Wales, but his fear of conscription into military service led him to quit the job, not wanting to give the Royal Navy the impression that he was suitable for seafaring work. In mid-1956, Graves secured Starkey a position as an apprentice machinist at a Liverpool equipment manufacturer.

While working at the facility Starkey befriended Roy Trafford, and the two bonded over their shared interest in music.Trafford introduced him to skiffle, and he quickly became a fervent admirer. In 1957, he cofounded his first band, the two began rehearsing songs in the manufacturing plant’s cellar they were joined by Starkey’s neighbour and co-worker, the guitarist Eddie Miles, forming the Eddie Miles Band, later renamed Eddie Clayton and the Clayton Squares after a Liverpool landmark. Performing popular skiffle songs such as “Rock Island Line” and “Walking Cane”. On Christmas Day 1957, Graves gave Starkey a second-hand drum kit consisting of a snare drum, bass drum and a makeshift cymbal fashioned from an old rubbish bin lid. Starr had been a devoted fan of skiffle and blues music, He was also influenced by country artists, including Hank Williams, Buck Owens and Hank Snow, and jazz drummers such as Chico Hamilton and Yusef Lateef, whose compositional style inspired Starr’s fluid and energetic drum fills and grooves Gene Autry and Lee Dorsey Were also among Starr’s first musical heroes.

He joined Al Caldwell’s Texans, a skiffle group who were looking for someone with a proper drum kit so that the group could transition from one of Liverpool’s best-known skiffle acts to a full-fledged rock and roll band. About this time he adopted the stage name Ringo Starr; derived from the rings he wore and also because it implied a country western influence. His drum solos were billed as Starr Time. By early 1960 the Hurricanes had become one of Liverpool’s leading bands and were offered a three-month residency at a Butlins holiday camp in Wales. The Butlins gig led to other opportunities for the band, including an unpleasant tour of US Air Force bases in France. The Hurricanes became so successful that when initially offered a highly coveted residency in Hamburg, they turned it down because of their prior commitment with Butlins. However They eventually accepted, joining the Beatles at Bruno Koschmider‍ ’s Kaiserkeller on 1 October 1960, where Starr first met the Beatles. Storm’s Hurricanes were given top-billing over the Beatles, however Starr performed with the Beatles during a few stand-in engagements while in Hamburg.

On 15 October 1960, he drummed with John Lennon, Paul McCartney and George Harrison, recording with them for the first time while backing Hurricanes singer Lu Walters on the George Gershwin aria “Summertime”.During Starr’s first stay in Hamburg he also met Tony Sheridan, who valued his drumming abilities to the point of asking Starr to leave the Hurricanes and join his band. So Starkey quit the Hurricanes in January 1962 and briefly joined Sheridan in Hamburg before finally joining the Beatles in August 1962, replacing Pete Best. Starr first performed as a member of the band on 18 August 1962, at a horticultural society dance at Port Sunlight and an appearance at the Cavern Club the following day. Starr’s first recording session as a member of the Beatles took place on 4 September 1962. The Beatles next singles were Please Please Me and Love Me Do and performed on Thank Your Lucky Stars and The Ed Sullivan Show in the United States. During live performances, the Beatles continued the Starr Time routine that had been popular among his fans: Lennon would place a microphone in front of Starr’s kit in preparation for his spotlight moment and audiences would erupt in screams.

Starr also played key roles in the Beatles’ films and appeared in numerous other films. He sang lead vocals on the songs “With a Little Help from My Friends”, “Yellow Submarine” and their cover of “Act Naturally”. He also wrote the Beatles’ songs “Don’t Pass Me By” and “Octopus’s Garden”, and is credited as a co-writer of others, such as “What Goes On” and “Flying”. When the Beatles made their film debut in A Hard Day’s Night, Starr garnered much praise from critics, who considered both his delivery of deadpan one-liners and his non-speaking scenes highlights of the movie. After the release of the Beatles’ second feature film, Help! (1965), Starr won a Melody Maker poll for his performance as the central character in the film.

Sadly In 1964 Starr contracted pharyngitis and tonsillitis, shortly before a tour ofDenmark, the Netherlands, Asia, Australia and New Zealand, and was temporarily replaced for five concert dates by 24-year-old session drummer Jimmie Nicol, before rejoining the band in Melbourne on 15 June. On 11 February 1965, Starr married Maureen Cox. In August 1966, the Beatles released Revolver, their seventh UK LP featuring the song “Yellow Submarine”, with Starr as lead singer. Starr also sang lead vocals on “With a Little Help from My Friends” on the 1967 album, Sgt. Pepper’s Lonely Hearts Club Band. Sadly though the Beatles Manager Brian Epstein died August 1967 and Soon afterwards, the band began filming the Magical Mystery Tour. Then In February 1968, Starr became the first Beatle to sing during another artist’s show without the other three present when he sang the Buck Owens hit “Act Naturally”. He also performed a duet with Cilla Black, “Do you Like Me Just a Little Bit?” on her BBC One television programme, Cilla.

In 1968 The Beatles, released the classic “White Album” inspired by a visit to the Maharishi Mahesh Yogi at his ashram in Rishikesh, India where they had of their most prolific writing periods, composing some fantastic songs including “Don’t Pass Me By”. Sadly During the recording of the White Album, relations within the band deteriorated to the point where Starr quit the band for two weeks, taking a holiday with his family in Sardinia on a boat loaned by Peter Sellers. During this time Ringo was served octopus, and A subsequent conversation with the ship’s captain regarding the behaviours of the animal served as the inspiration for the song “Octopus’s Garden”. He returned to the studio two weeks later and the Beatles began production of their’ fourth feature film, Let It Be, and its accompanying LP, featuring the song “I Want You (She’s So Heavy)”. Sadly relations deteriorated again within the the band until September 1969, when Lennon quit the Beatles followed by McCartney On 10 April 1970,

After the Beatles break-up in 1970, Starr released two solo albums Sentimental Journey, featuring renditions of songs by Quincy Jones, Maurice Gibb, George Martin and Paul McCartney, and the country-inspired Beaucoups of Blues, featuring Nashville session musician Pete Drake. He also released successful singles including “It Don’t Come Easy”,”Photograph” and “You’re Sixteen”. Starr played drums on Lennon’s John Lennon/Plastic Ono Band (1970), Ono’s Yoko Ono/Plastic Ono Band (1970), and on Harrison’s albums All Things Must Pass (1970) and Living in the Material World.Starr participated in the Concert for Bangladesh, organised by Harrison, and made his directorial debut with the T. Rex documentary Born to Boogie. In 1972, he released his most successful UK single, “Back Off Boogaloo”. In 1973 he released the album Ringo and the songs Photograph”, co-written with Harrison, and “You’re Sixteen”, written by the Sherman Brothers and featuring writing and musical contributions from Harrison, Lennon and McCartney including “Oh My My”. Next He released The album Goodnight Vienna in 1974 featuring a cover of the Platters’ “Only You (And You Alone)”and “No No Song”.

He became romantically involved with Lynsey de Paul after playing tambourine on a song she wrote and produced for Vera Lynn, “Don’t You Remember When”, and inspiring another De Paul song, “If I Don’t Get You the Next One Will” and founded the record label Ring O’Records in 1975. Then in 1976 Starr appeared as a guest in the Band’s farewell concert, featured in the 1978 Martin Scorsese documentary The Last Waltz and released Ringo’s Rotogravure, featuring compositions by McCartney, Lennon and Harrison which contained the songs A Dose of Rock ‘n’ Roll” and a cover of “Hey Baby”. Starr’s next album was a curious blend of disco and 1970s pop, entitled Ringo the 4th. Following Lennon’s murder in 1980, Harrison modified the lyrics of a song he had originally written for Starr, “All Those Years Ago”, as a tribute to their former bandmate which included vocal contributions from both Paul and Linda McCartney and Starr’s original drum part. In 1981, Starr released the album Stop and Smell the Roses, containing the Harrison composition “Wrack My Brain”.

From 1984 to 1986, Starr narrated the first two series of the children’s series Thomas & Friends, based on the books by the Reverend W. Awdry and also portrayed the character Mr. Conductor in the programme’s American spin-off Shining Time Station, In 1985, he performed with his son Zak as part of Artists United Against Apartheid on the recording, Sun City. In 1987 Starr played drums on the song “When We Was Fab”, from Harrison’s album Cloud no. 9 co-written by Harrison and Jeff Lynne. I’m 1987 Starr, Harrison and Lynne joined Eric Clapton, Elton John, Phil Collins and Ray Cooper in a performance for the Prince’s Trust charity. In 1989, Ringo Starr & His All-Starr Band performed in front of an audience of ten thousand in Dallas, Texas. The album Ringo Starr and His All-Starr Band featured a compilation of live performances. Starr also recorded a version of the song “I Call Your Name” for a television special marking the 10th anniversary of John Lennon’s death and the 50th anniversary of Lennon’s birth which was performed by a supergroup composed of Lynne, Tom Petty, Joe Walsh and Jim Keltner.

In 1991 Starr made a cameo appearance on The Simpsons episode “Brush with Greatness” and contributed an original song, “You Never Know”, to the soundtrack of the John Hughes film Curly Sue. In 1992, Starr released the album Time Takes Time, featuring guest appearances by Brian Wilson and Harry Nilsson. In 1995 Starr, McCartney and Harrison released the Beatles Anthology for which They recorded two new Beatles songs built around solo vocal and piano tapes recorded by Lennon “Free as a Bird” and “Real Love”. Starr guested on two songs from McCartney’s 1997 album, Flaming Pie. McCartney had written a song about Starr’s ex-wife Maureen, who died in 1994, called “Little Willow” and asked Starr if he would play on another song, “Beautiful Night”. They also recorded a jam session, which became, “Really Love You”, In 1998, he released the album Vertical Man featuring Producer Mark Hudson, and his band the Roundheads, plus many famous guests including Martin, McCartney and George Harrison.

In 2002 Starr was inducted into the Percussive Arts Society Hall of Fame and On 29 November 2002 (the first anniversary of Harrison’s death), Starr performed “Photograph” and a cover of Carl Perkins’ “Honey Don’t” at the Concert for George held in the Royal Albert Hall, London. In 2003, Starr served as an honorary Santa Tracker and voice-over personality during the London stop in Father Christmas’s annual Christmas Eve journey, as depicted in the annual NORAD tracks Santa program. According to NORAD officials, he was “a Starr in the east” who helped guide North American Aerospace Defense Command’s Santa-tracking. In 2005, Liverpool’s City Council announced plans to demolish Starr’s birthplace, 9 Madryn Street, stating that it had “no historical significance”. However after protests the LCC later announced that the building would be taken apart brick by brick and preserved. In 2008 Starr released the album Liverpool 8 produced by David A. Stewart, Mark Hudson and Starr. In 2009, Starr reunited with McCartney at the David Lynch “Change Begins Within” Benefit Concert at Radio City Music Hall. After a separate performance from Starr he later joined McCartney to perform “With a Little Help from My Friends”, “I Saw Her Standing There” and “Cosmically Conscious”. Starr also promoted The Beatles: Rock Band video game and in 2009, Starr once again performed the voice of Thomas the Tank Engine for “The Official BBC Children in Need Medley”.

In 2010 Starr self-produced and released his fifteenth studio album, Y Not, which included the track “Walk with You” featuring a vocal contribution from McCartney he also appeared during Hope for Haiti Now: A Global Benefit for Earthquake Relief. On 7 July 2010, Starr celebrated his 70th birthday at Radio City Music Hall, New York with another All-Starr Band concert, with friends and family joining him on stage including Yoko Ono and his son Zak: McCartney made a surprise appearance. Starr also recorded a cover of Buddy Holly’s “Think It Over” for the tribute album Listen to Me: Buddy Holly, which was released in 2011. In 2012, he released the album Ringo 2012. In2014, Starr reunited with Paul McCartney for a special performance at the 56th Annual Grammy Awards performing the song “Queenie Eye” at the Staples Centre in Los Angeles, he was also featured alongside McCartney in the programme The Night That Changed America: A Grammy Salute to The Beatles. In 2014, Starr toured Canada and the US with an updated version of the Twelfth All-Starr Band. He also became involved in “#peacerocks”, an anti-violence campaign started by fashion designer John Varvatos, in conjunction with the David Lynch Foundation.In September 2014, Starr won at the GQ Men of the Year Awards for his humanitarian work with the David Lynch Foundation. Starr”s latest album, Postcards from Paradise was released 2015. In 2011, Rolling Stone readers named Starr the fifth-greatest drummer of all time. Starr, who was previously inducted into the Rock and Roll Hall of Fame as a Beatle in 1988, was inducted for his solo career in 2015, making him one of 21 performers inducted more than once.


Jon Pertwee

Best known for starring as the Third Doctor in the science-fiction series Doctor Who between 1970 and 1974, the English actor, entertainer and cabaret performer John Pertwee was born 7 July 1919. Pertwee was educated at Frensham Heights School, an independent school in Rowledge, near Farnham in Surrey, at Sherborne School in Sherborne in Dorset, and at some other schools from which he was expelled. After school, he went to the Royal Academy of Dramatic Art (RADA), from which he was also expelled after he refused to play a Greek “wind” during one of the lessons, feeling it was a waste of both his time and his father’s money. He was also accused of writing graffiti about the tutors on the lavatory walls.

During the Second World War, Pertwee spent six years in the Royal Navy. He was a crew member of HMS Hood and was transferred off the ship for officer training shortly before she was sunk by the German battleship Bismarck, losing all but three men in May 1941. Later, he was attached to the highly-secretive Naval Intelligence Division, working alongside future James Bond author Ian Fleming, and reporting directly to Prime Minister, Winston Churchill, and Deputy Prime Minister, Clement Attlee. Teaching commandos how to use escapology equipment, compasses in brass buttons, secret maps in white cotton handkerchiefs, pipes you could smoke that also fired a .22 bullet.

After the war, he made a name for himself as a comedy actor on radio in Waterlogged Spa, alongside Eric Barker, and Puffney Post Office in which he played a hapless old postman with the catch-phrase “It doesn’t matter what you do, as long as you tears them up.” On 15 November 1948, at the Wood Green Empire, he was billed as ‘The Most Versatile Voice in Radio. He also appeared in the Radio Shows “Merry-go-Round” and “Up the Pole”‘. From 1959 to 1977, he had a long-running role as the conniving Chief Petty Officer Pertwee in The Navy Lark on BBC Radio. He was known as a Danny Kaye look-alike, Whom he impersonated in the film Murder at the Windmill (1949).In 1953, he played Charlie Sterling in Will Any Gentleman…?. Alongside Future Doctor Who actor William Hartnell as Inspector Martin.

On stage, he played the part of Lycus in the 1963 London production of A Funny Thing Happened on the Way to the Forum with Frankie Howerd and appeared in the smaller role of Crassus in the 1966 film version. He appeared as Sidney Tait in the comedy film Ladies Who Do (1963). In 1966, Pertwee starred alongside Donald Sinden in the West End production of There’s a Girl in My Soup and also appeared in four Carry On films: Carry On Cleo (1964, as the soothsayer), Carry On Cowboy (1965, as Sheriff Earp), Carry On Screaming! (1966, as Dr. Fettle), and Carry On Columbus (1992, as the Duke of Costa Brava). In 1967 Pertwee had been producer David Croft’s choice for the role of Captain George Mainwaring in Dad’s Army.

His television career had started off with small parts in children’s shows featuring Richard Hearne’s Mr Pastry character. Later he made an appearance in The Avengers episode ‘From Venus With Love’ (1967) as Brigadier Whitehead, and in the 1970s, he guest-starred as a vicar in The Goodies’ episode “Wacky Wales”. In 1969, Pertwee was selected by outgoing producer Peter Bryant and the series’ next producer Derrick Sherwin to take over as the Doctor from Patrick Troughton in the television series Doctor Who. Pertwee had asked his agent to apply for the role for him and was surprised to find he was already on the shortlist. In a departure from the Doctor’s first two incarnations, Pertwee played the character as an active crusader with a penchant for action and fancy clothes, even while the character was exiled on Earth and serving with UNIT. He played the Doctor for five seasons from early 1970 to mid-1974, a longer stint than either of his predecessors in the role, William Hartnell and Patrick Troughton, although the Pertwee era of Doctor Who ‘only’ had 128 episodes compared to the Hartnell era having had 134 episodes, as the BBC relaxed its shooting schedule from 39–45 episodes per season to 25–26 episodes per season at the start of Pertwee’s tenure as Doctor Who. He stayed until 1974, When he retired as the Doctor to resume his stage career in The Bedwinner.

The main reason for his departure was the death of his good friend and co-star Roger Delgado (The Master) and the departures of co-star Katy Manning and producer Barry Letts. His last full-time appearance in the series was in the story Planet of the Spiders in June 1974, which finished with Tom Baker replacing him in the role. He also starred in The House That Dripped Blood (1971) as an arrogant horror film star named Paul Henderson, who meets his doom thanks to a genuine vampire cloak. In 1973, Pertwee endorsed the Co-op’s Baking Your Cake and Eating it, a recipe book written by Sarah Charles. Pertwee later reprised his role as The Doctor in the 20th anniversary story The Five Doctors and the Children in Need story Dimensions in Time, in two radio adventures and on stage in Doctor Who – The Ultimate Adventure. On 14 April 1971, Pertwee was the subject of Thames Television’s This Is Your Life.between 1974 and 1978 Pertwee was the host of the murder-mystery game show Whodunnit?,

Pertwee then took the starring role in Worzel Gummidge, based on the books written by Barbara Euphan Todd. First aired in 1979 on ITV, the series saw Pertwee as a scarecrow, and continued until 1981. In 1987 Worzel Gummidge Down Under aired until 1989 and was screened in the UK on Channel 4. In 1995, Pertwee played the role one last time in a one-off special for ITV, which celebrated 40 years of the channel. Pertwee played the title character in Worzel Gummidge, the musical, book and lyrics by Keith Waterhouse and Willis Hall, music by Denis King, which opened at London’s Cambridge Theatre in December 1981, co-starring Una Stubbs and Geoffrey Bayldon. Pertwee also recorded an album, Worzel Gummidge Sings, as well as a Christmas single. In 1976, Pertwee voiced and appeared in the television advertisement which promoted the Green Cross Code and also starred with Australian actress Julie Anthony in a West End production of the musical IRENE playing the camp fashion-designer “Madame Lucy”. Pertwee also features on the cast recording album. He also voiced the character of “Spotty” in the 1980s cartoon series SuperTed and in 1985 he starred in Do You Know The Milkyway? Portraying Dr. Neuross and another nine characters. In 1995 Pertwee also had the key voice of Death and other voice characterisations in the PC and PlayStation renditions of “Discworld”. And also played General Von Kramer in the Young Indiana Jones Chronicles episode “Attack of the Hawkmen”. In 1975 he portrayed The Colonel’ in “One of Our Dinosaurs is Missing .

He returned to the role of the Doctor in the 1983 20th anniversary television special The Five Doctors and in the 1993 charity special Dimensions in Time for Children in Need. He also portrayed the Doctor in the stage play Doctor Who – The Ultimate Adventure. He made a guest appearance in the “Lords and Ladies” episode of the BBC Radio 4 comedy series Harry Hill’s Fruit Corner, playing a Time Lord and also spoofed the role in the Radio 4 comedy The Skivers. He also presented the Doctor Who video releases The Troughton Years. In 1993, Pertwee was featured in the unofficial 30th anniversary release of Doctor Who entitled 30 Years of Time Travel and Beyond. Pertwee portrayed the Third Doctor in two further audio productions for BBC Radio, The Paradise of Death and The Ghosts of N-Space. In April 1995, he appeared in Devious, an amateur video drama set between the second Doctor’s trial at the end of The War Games and before the start of Spearhead From Space. Pertwee’s final film role was in a short film entitled Cloud Cuckoo and also appeared
on Cilla’s Surprise, Surprise, in 1996.

Pertwee sadly died in his sleep from a heart attack in Connecticut on 20 May 1996, at the age of 76. He was survived by his wife Ingeborg Rhoesa, and two children who had followed him into the acting profession, Sean Pertwee and Dariel Pertwee. Many Doctor Who actors payed tribute including Tom Baker and Colin Baker His body was cremated at Putney Vale Crematorium with a toy Worzel Gummidge affixed to the coffin, following the instructions in his will. His death came six days after the American broadcast of the Doctor Who television film, which used a logo based on the one from his era of the television series and featured a dedication to Pertwee at its end. Pertwee’s voice was used in the 40th Anniversary Doctor Who audio drama, Zagreus, as the TARDIS helps a corrupted Eighth Doctor (voiced by Paul McGann). Pertwee also wrote two autobiographies: Moon Boots and Dinner Suits and the posthumously published Doctor Who: I Am the Doctor – Jon Pertwee’s Final Memoir. In 2000, Jon Pertwee: The Biography by Bernard Bale (was published by André Deutsch, and included a few chapters by Pertwee’s widow Ingeborg.

Archival footage of Pertwee has been used several times in the revived Doctor Who. Including “The Next Doctor” when the Tenth Doctor shows Jackson Lake an infostamp about himself, “The Eleventh Hour” when the Eleventh Doctor rhetorically asks the Atraxi how previous alien invasion attempts were stopped, “The Name of the Doctor” and “The Day of the Doctor” which shows the Third Doctor assisting his other incarnations in sending Gallifrey to a pocket universe to protect it from the Daleks.

Cosford International Large Model Air Show

Hundreds of scale models of iconic aircraft take to the skies at the annual Large Model Air Show. Taking place on the airfield at Cosford, 6 and 7 July 2019. Visitors And aviation enthusiasts will be able to see a whole range of models designed, built and flown by members of the Large Model Association from biplanes to modern day jets. The model aircraft range from £2,000 up to £30,000 Some of the kits can take two weeks to assemble, whereas large models such as a VC10 can take seven years to assemble. Engines used include those similar to petrol lawn mowers through to miniature jet engines costing £5,000 and the spe of the models being flown can range from 50mph up to 200mph. There was also a flypast by the Spitfire and Hurricane from the Battle of Britain Memorial Flight.

Alice in Wonderland by Lewis carroll

English author Lewis Carroll ( Charles Lutwidge Dodgson) told Alice Liddell and her sisters a story that would eventually form the basis for his book Alice’s Adventures in Wonderland In a rowing boat on the River Thames from Oxford to Godstow, On July 4 1862.. which was subsequently published 4 July 1865. The journey began at Folly Bridge near Oxford and ended five miles away in the village Godstow. During the trip Dodgson told the girls a story that featured a bored little girl named Alice who goes looking for an adventure. The girls loved it, and Alice Liddell asked Dodgson to write it down for her. He began writing the manuscript of the story the next day, although that earliest version no longer exists. The girls and Dodgson took another boat trip a month later when he elaborated the plot to the story of Alice, and in November he began working on the manuscript in earnest. It tells of a girl named Alice falling through a rabbit hole into a fantasy world populated by peculiar, anthropomorphic creatures. The tale plays with logic, giving the story lasting popularity with adults as well as with children.It is considered to be one of the best examples of the literary nonsense genre. Its narrative course and structure, characters and imagery have been enormously influential in both popular culture and literature, especially in the fantasy genre.

The novel starts with Alice feeling bored and drowsy while sitting on the riverbank with her elder sister who is reading a book with no pictures or conversations. She then notices a talking, clothed White Rabbit with a pocket watch run past. She follows it down a rabbit hole when suddenly she falls a long way to a curious hall with many locked doors of all sizes. She finds a small key to a door too small for her to fit through, but through it she sees an attractive garden. She then discovers a bottle on a table labelled “DRINK ME,” the contents of which cause her to shrink too small to reach the key which she has left on the table. She eats a cake with “EAT ME” written on it in currants.

After eating the cake Alice grows alarmingly and her head hits the ceiling. Alice starts crying and her tears flood the hallway. After shrinking down again Alice swims through her own tears and meets a Mouse, who is swimming as well and tries unsuccessfully to talk to him. The sea of tears becomes crowded with other animals and birds that have been swept away by the rising waters. Alice and the other animals reach the bank and a Dodo decides that the best thing to dry them off would be a Caucus-Race, which consists of everyone running in a circle with no clear winner. Then The White Rabbit appears and Mistaking her for his maidservant, Mary Ann, orders Alice to go into the house and retrieve some gloves but once inside she starts growing. The horrified Rabbit orders his gardener, Bill the Lizard, to climb on the roof and go down the chimney. Outside, Alice hears the voices of animals who hurl pebbles at her, which turn into little cakes and after eating them, Alice shrinks again.

Alice then encounters a blue Caterpillar on a mushroom smoking a hookah, who tells Alice that one side of the mushroom will make her taller while the other side will make her shorter. She breaks off two pieces from the mushroom. One side makes her shrink smaller than ever, while the other causes her to grow alarmingly. eventually Alice brings herself back to her normal height and discovers a small estate and uses the mushroom to reach a more appropriate height. She sees a Fish-Footman deliver an invitation to the Duchess, who lives at the estate a meets The Duchess’s Cook who is throwing dishes and making a soup that has too much pepper, which causes Alice, the Duchess, and her baby to sneeze violently. Alice is then given the baby by the Duchess which turns into a pig. The Duchess’s Cheshire Cat then directs her to the March Hare’s house.

Here Alice becomes a guest at a “mad” tea party along with the March Hare, the Hatter, and a very tired Dormouse who falls asleep frequently, only to be violently woken up moments later by the March Hare and the Hatter. The characters give Alice many riddles and stories. Eventually though Alice tires of all the inane riddles and leaves claiming that it was the stupidest tea party that she had ever been to. Upon leaving the Tea-Party Alice enters the Queen of Hearts garden and encounters three living playing cards painting the white roses on a rose tree red because The Queen of Hearts hates white roses. A procession of more cards, kings and queens and even the White Rabbit enters the garden. Alice then meets the King and Queen, who is fond of saying “Off with his head!” For the slightest transgression. Alice is invited to play a game of croquet with the Queen and the rest of her subjects but the game quickly descends into chaos. Live flamingos are used as mallets and hedgehogs as balls. The Queen is then prompted by the Cheshire Cat to release the Duchess from prison.

The Duchess is then brought to the croquet ground at Alice’s request, and The Queen of Hearts dismisses her on the threat of execution and introduces Alice to the Gryphon, who takes her to the Mock Turtle and the Gryphon then suggests they play a game. So The Mock Turtle and the Gryphon dance to the Lobster Quadrille, and then the Gryphon drags Alice away for an impending trial where the Knave of Hearts is accused of stealing the Queen’s tarts. The jury is composed of various animals, including Bill the Lizard, the White Rabbit is the court’s trumpeter, and the judge is the King of Hearts. During the proceedings, Alice finds to her alarms that she is steadily growing larger. Others Attending the trial include the Hatter, and the Duchess’s cook. Alice is then called upon to give evidence as a witness. Sadly though her increasing size causes problems and The King and Queen order Alice to be gone, citing Rule 42 (“All persons more than a mile high to leave the court”). However Alice disputes their judgement and refuses to leave until the Queen of Hearts eventually shouts “Off With Her Head!”

Chris Squire (Yes)

Chris Squire, the bass player, vocalist and Founding member with the Progressive Rock bands YES, XYZ and Conspiracy sadly died 27 June 2015. He was Born 4 March 1948 and grew up in central London, where, in 1964, he was suspended from school for having long hair. During the 1960’s he played in a few bands, including the Selfs, the Syn, and Mabel Greer’s Toyshop and it was through that last band that he met Jon Anderson. The two bonded over Simon and Garfunkel’s music. They formed Yes in 1968 and released their debut album in 1969.

Yes went on to achieve worldwide success with their progressive music, mystical lyrics, elaborate album art, live stage sets and symphonic style of rock music. They are regarded as one of the pioneers of the progressive genre. They were Formed in 1968 by Jon Anderson and Bill Bruford and released two albums together but began to enjoy success after the release of The Yes Album and Fragile, which featured new arrivals Steve Howe and Rick Wakeman. They achieved further success with the albums Close to the Edge and Tales from Topographic Oceans. Wakeman was replaced by Patrick Moraz, who played on Relayer (1974). Wakeman returned on Going for the One (1977) and Tormato (1978). Anderson and Wakeman left the group due to musical differences amongst the band in 1980, and both went on to pursue solo careers. Their replacements, Trevor Horn and Steve Downes, featured on Drama (1980) and its supporting tour before disbanding in 1981. Howe and Downes went to form Asia.

Yes reformed in 1982 after Squire and White were joined by the returning Jon Anderson and Tony Kaye, with the addition of guitarist Trevor Rabin. They adopted a pop rock sound and released the number one single “Owner of a Lonely Heart” and 90125 (1983), their best-selling album to date, followed by Big Generator (1987). Anderson left and co-formed the side project Anderson Bruford Wakeman Howe with the named members in 1989. Following a legal battle amongst both Yes groups, they formed an eight-man band to perform on Union (1991) and its supporting tour. Rabin and Kaye featured on Talk (1994) before leaving, while Wakeman and Howe returned with Keys to Ascension (1996) and Keys to Ascension 2 (1997). Wakeman was then replaced by Igor Khoroshev, who was featured on Open Your Eyes (1997) and The Ladder (1999) along with guitarist Billy Sherwood. The release of Magnification (2001) marked the first album since 1970 to feature an orchestra. Squire also joined the short-lived supergroup XYZ, (ex-Yes, Zeppelin) which featured Squire, Yes’ Alan White, and Led Zeppelin’s Jimmy Page.

Alan Turing

British mathematician, logician, cryptanalyst, and computer scientist Alan Turing OBE, FRS  was Born on June 23rd, 1912 in Maida Vale, and grew up in Hastings. He displayed great individuality from a young age. At 14 he went to Sherborne School in Dorset.Turing subsequently read mathematics at Cambridge,He was completely original thinkerwho shaped the modern world, and assisted in the development of the innovative Manchester computers. He was also highly influential in the development of computer science, providing a formalisation of the concepts of “algorithm” and “computation” with the Turing machine, which played a sinificant role in the creation of the modern computer. Turing is widely considered to be the father of computer science and artificial intelligece.He also became interested in mathematical biology and wrote a paper on the chemical basis of morphogenesis, and predicted oscillating chemical reactions such as the Belousov–Zhabotinsky reaction, which were first observed in the 1960s.

On 4 September 1939 the day after Britain declared war on Germany, Turing reported to Bletchley Park where he worked for the Government Code and Cypher School (GCCS)the forerunner of GCHQ, Britain’s codebreaking centre. For a time he was head of Hut 8, the section responsible for German naval cryptanalysis. Turing led a team whose ingenuity and intellect were turned to the task of breaking German ciphers. He devised a number of techniques for breaking German ciphers and One of Turing’s main contributions whilst there was to invent the Bombe, an electromechanical machine used to find the daily settings of the Enigma machine. as a result he played an absolutely vital part of the British war effort and It is without question that his efforts helped shorten the war significantly, saving the lives of millions of people.He was also a remarkable British hero who helped create the modern world. Now known as the father of computer science, his inventions contributed greatly to the groundwork for the modern computer.

After the war he worked at the National Physical Laboratory, where he created one of the first designs for a stored-program computer, the ACE. In 1948 Turing joined Max Newman’s Computing Laboratory at Manchester University, where he assisted in the development of the Manchester computers and invented a type of theoretical machine now called a Turing Machine, which formalized what it means to compute a number. Turing’s importance extends far beyond Turing Machines. His work deciphering secret codes drastically shortened World War II and pioneered early computer technology.He was also an early innovator in the field of artificial intelligence, and came up with a way to test if computers could think – now known as the Turing Test. Besides this abstract work, he was down to earth; he designed and built real machines, even making his own relays and wiring up circuits. This combination of pure math and computing machines was the foundation of computer science.

Despite his achievements, and valuable contributions to cryptanalysis he was treated appallingly by the British Government and did not receive the recognition and plaudits that he deserved while alive because of his life style choices. A burglary at his home led Turing to admit to police that he was a practicing homosexual, at a time when it was illegal in Britain. This led to his arrest and conviction in 1952 for ‘gross indecency’. He was subsequently forced to choose between imprisonment and chemical castration. He chose chemical castration (treatment with female hormones) as an alternative to prison. As a result of his conviction he lost security clearance and was not allowed to continue his work. Sadly this all proved too much for Turing and On 8 June 1954 just over two weeks before his 42nd birthday, Turing was found dead from cyanide poisoning. An inquest determined that his death was suicide and he had poisoned himself with cyanide.

Thankfully since Turning’s birth most people’s attitudes have changed and most are now far more tolerant of people’s preferences. Since 1966 The US-based Association of Computing Machinery has annually awarded The Turing Award for technical contribution to the computing community. This is the computing world’s highest honour and is considered equivalent to the Nobel prize. On 10 September 2009, following an Internet campaign, British Prime Minister Gordon Brown also made an official public apology on behalf of the British government for “the appalling way he was treated”. There is also A fully functional rebuild of the Bombe which can be found today at Bletchley Park, along with the excellent Turing exhibition.