Rosamunde Pilcher OBE

British author Rosamunde Pilcher, OBE (née Scott; was born 22 September 1924). She is best known as a writer of romance novels and mainstream women’s fiction. Early in her career she was also published under the pen name Jane Fraser. She retired from writing in 2000. Her son is the writer Robin Pilcher.In 1949, Pilcher’s first book, a romance novel, was published by Mills and Boon, under the pseudonym Jane Fraser. She published a further ten novels under that name. In 1955, she also began writing under her real name with Secret to Tell. By 1965 she had dropped the pseudonym and was signing her own name to all of her novels.

Pilcher began writing as a refuge from her daily life and claims that writing saved her marriage. The real breakthrough in Pilcher’s career came in 1987, when she wrote the family saga, The Shell Seekers. Since then her books have made her one of the more successful contemporary female authors.One of her most famous works, The Shell Seekers, focuses on Penelope Stern Keeling, an elderly British woman who relives her life in flashbacks, and on her relationship with her adult children. Keeling’s life was not extraordinary, but it spans “a time of huge importance and change in the world.” The novel describes the everyday details of what life during World War II was like for some of those who lived in Britain. The Shell Seekers sold more than five million copies worldwide and was adapted for the stage by Terence Brady and Charlotte Bingham. In 1996, her novel Coming Home won the Romantic Novel of the Year Award by Romantic Novelists’ Association.Pilcher retired from writing in 2000. Two years later she was created an Officer of the Order of the British Empire (OBE).

Her books are especially popular in Germany because the national TV station ZDF (Zweites Deutsches Fernsehen) has produced more than 100 of her stories for TV starting with “Day of the Storm”. These TV films are some of the most popular programmes on ZDF. Both ZDF programme director Dr. Claus Beling and Rosamunde Pilcher were awarded the British Tourism Award in 2002 for the positive effect the books and the TV versions had on Cornwall and Devon tourism within the UK. Notable film locations include Prideaux Placean Elizabethan Manor with extensive grounds in Padstow. The 9th century stately home in St Germans, Port Eliot, The Duke of Cornwall Hotel a 1863 Victorian Gothic building in Plymouth and much of the coast line of Chapel Port

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Sir Henry Segrave

Famous for setting three land speed records and the water speed record, Sir Henry O’Neil de Hane Segrave was born in Baltimore, Maryland on 22nd September 1896. He was the first person to hold both the land and water speed records simultaneously and became the first person to travel at over 200 mph (320 km/h) in a land vehicle.He was commissioned into the Royal Warwickshire Regiment in 1914 and served as a fighter pilot with the Royal Flying Corps from January 1916. In July 1916 he became a flight commander as a temporary captain. In 1919 he transferred to the Royal Air Force Administrative Branch, but soon resigned his commission due to his wounds. Segrave bragged that he would drive a car at over 200 miles per hour (320 km/h). In 1921 the 200-Mile Race at Brooklands was organised by the Junior Car Club, the first long-distance race to be run in Britain. The race, a contest for 1,500 c.c. light cars, was won by Segrave in a Talbot-Darracq.

He was the first Briton to win a Grand Prix in a British car. He won the 1923 French Grand Prix and the 1924 San Sebastian Grand Prix at Circuito Lasarte (Spain) in a Sunbeam automobile. After a further win at Miramas in France, he retired from racing to concentrate on speed records.On 21 March 1926, he set his first land speed record in his 4-litre Sunbeam Tiger Ladybird on the sands at Southport, England at 152.33 mph (245.149 km/h). This record lasted for just over a month, until broken by J.G. Parry-Thomas driving Babs. He regained the land speed record in 29 March 1927 in his 1000 HP Sunbeam Mystery (also known as ‘the Slug’) at the Daytona Beach Road Course at 203.79 mph (327.97 km/h), becoming the first person to travel over 200 mph (320 km/h).Segrave set his final land speed record at 231.45 mph (372.46 km/h) in his new car, the beautiful Golden Arrow, at Daytona Beach on 11 March 1929. This car had only 18.74 miles (30.16 km) on it, which makes it the least used car to set the World Land Speed record. Segrave then began concentrating on the water speed record. Golden Arrow has never been used since. The Golden Arrow is on display along with the Sunbeam 350HP and the Sunbeam 1000HP at the National Motor Museum, Beaulieu.

Segrave was also an avid motorboat racer and after his 1929 land speed record, he immediately went to Miami for a motorboat race against Garfield Wood, multiple water speed record holder and the first man to travel over 100 miles per hour on water. Segrave won, causing Wood’s first defeat in nine years. After Segrave returned to Great Britain, he was knighted for his many accomplishments. A few months after receiving his knighthood, on Friday 13 June 1930, Sir Henry Segrave unknowingly captured the water speed record driving Miss England II on England’s largest natural lake, Windermere. In a follow-up run the boat presumably hit a log and capsized, killing Miss England’s mechanic, Victor Halliwell. Segrave’s unconscious body was recovered, and taken to a hospital. He regained consciousness for a moment, was informed that he had indeed broken the record, then died a few moments later of lung haemorrhages on 13 June 1930 however The Segrave Trophy was established in 1930 to commemorate his life.

Michael Faraday

English Scientist Michael Faraday FRS was born 22 September 1791 in Newington Butts. The young Michael Faraday, received little formal education and had to educate himself.At fourteen he became the apprentice to George Riebau, a local bookbinder and bookseller in Blandford Street.During his seven-year apprenticeship he read many books, including Isaac Watts’ The Improvement of the Mind, and he enthusiastically implemented the principles and suggestions contained therein. At this time he also developed an interest in science, especially in electricity. Faraday was particularly inspired by the book Conversations on Chemistry by Jane Marcet.

In 1812, after his apprenticeship, Faraday attended lectures by the eminent English chemist Humphry Davy of the Royal Institution and Royal Society, and John Tatum, founder of the City Philosophical Society. Faraday subsequently sent Davy a three-hundred-page book based on notes that he had taken during these lectures. Davy’s reply was immediate, kind, and favourable. In 1813, Davy employed Faraday as Chemical Assistant at the Royal Institution on Very soon Davy entrusted Faraday with preparation of nitrogen trichloride samples, and they both became injured in an explosion of this very sensitive substance.

In the class-based English society of the time, Faraday was not considered a gentleman. When Davy set out on a long tour of the continent in 1813–15, his valet did not wish to go. Instead, Faraday went as Davy’s scientific assistant, and was asked to act as Davy’s valet until a replacement could be found in Paris. Faraday was forced to fill the role of valet as well as assistant throughout the trip Making Faraday so miserable that he contemplated giving up science altogether. The trip did, however, give him access to the scientific elite of Europe and exposed him to a host of stimulating ideas

Faraday married Sarah Barnard They met through their families at the Sandemanian church, and he confessed his faith to the Sandemanian congregation the month after they were married. They had no children. Faraday was a devout Christian; his Sandemanian denomination was an offshoot of the Church of Scotland. Well after his marriage, he served as deacon and for two terms as an elder in the meeting house of his youth. His church was located at Paul’s Alley in the Barbican. This meeting house was relocated in 1862 to Barnsbury Grove, Islington; this North London location was where Faraday served the final two years of his second term as elder prior to his resignation from that post. Biographers have noted that “a strong sense of the unity of God and nature pervaded Faraday’s life and work.”

In June 1832, the University of Oxford granted Faraday a Doctor of Civil Law degree (honorary). During his lifetime, he was offered a knighthood in recognition for his services to science. He twice refused to become President of the Royal Society. He was elected a foreign member of the Royal Swedish Academy of Sciences in 1838, and was one of eight foreign members elected to the French Academy of Sciences in 1844. In 1849 he was elected as associated member to the Royal Institute of the Netherlands, which two years later became the Royal Netherlands Academy of Arts and Sciences and he was subsequently made foreign member. Faraday suffered a nervous breakdown in 1839 but eventually returned to his electromagnetic investigations. In 1848, as a result of representations by the Prince Consort, Faraday was awarded a grace and favour house in Hampton Court. When asked by the British government to advise on the production of chemical weapons for use in the Crimean War (1853–1856), Faraday refused to participate citing ethical reasons. Faraday died at his house at Hampton Court on 25 August 1867, aged 75. He had previously turned down burial in Westminster Abbey, but he has a memorial plaque there, near Isaac Newton’s tomb. Faraday was interred in the dissenters’ (non-Anglican) section of Highgate Cemetery.

Faraday was one of the most influential scientists in history. He contributed to the fields of electromagnetism and electrochemistry. His main discoveries include those of electromagnetic induction, diamagnetism and electrolysis.It was by his research on the magnetic field around a conductor carrying a direct current that Faraday established the basis for the concept of the electromagnetic field in physics. Faraday also established that magnetism could affect rays of light and that there was an underlying relationship between the two phenomena. He similarly discovered the principle of electromagnetic induction, diamagnetism, and the laws of electrolysis. His inventions of electromagnetic rotary devices formed the foundation of electric motor technology, and it was largely due to his efforts that electricity became practical for use in technology.

As a chemist, Faraday discovered benzene, investigated the clathrate hydrate of chlorine, invented an early form of the Bunsen burner and the system of oxidation numbers, and popularised terminology such as anode, cathode, electrode, and ion. Faraday ultimately became the first and foremost Fullerian Professor of Chemistry at the Royal Institution of Great Britain, a lifetime position. Albert Einstein kept a picture of Faraday on his study wall, alongside pictures of Isaac Newton and James Clerk Maxwell. Physicist Ernest Rutherford stated; “When we consider the magnitude and extent of his discoveries and their influence on the progress of science and of industry, there is no honour too great to pay to the memory of Faraday, one of the greatest scientific discoverers of all time”.

Liam Gallagher

Liam Gallagher, former front man with English Rock Band Oasis was born 21st September 1972. Formed in Manchester in 1991, Oasis were Originally known as The Rain, the group was formed by Liam Gallagher (vocals & tambourine), Paul “Bonehead” Arthurs (guitar), Paul “Guigsy” McGuigan (bass guitar) and Tony McCarroll (drums, percussion), who were soon joined by Liam’s older brother Noel Gallagher (lead guitar and vocals). They have had eight UK number-one singles and eight UK number-one albums, and won fifteen NME Awards, nine Q Awards, four MTV Europe Music Awards and six Brit Awards, including one in 2007 for outstanding contribution to music and one for the best album of the last 30 years as voted by the BBC Radio 2 listeners; they have been nominated for three Grammy Awards. As of 2009, the band have sold an estimated 70 million records worldwide.

The band were listed in the Guinness Book of World Records in 2010 for “Longest Top 10 UK Chart Run by a Group” after an unprecedented run of 22 top 10 hits in the UK. The band also holds the Guinness World Record for being the most successful act in the UK between the years 1995 and 2005, spending 765 weeks in the Top 75 singles and albums charts.Its members were signed to independent record label Creation Records and afterwards released their record-setting debut albumDefinitely Maybe in 1994. The following year, the band recorded (What’s the Story) Morning Glory? (1995) with their new drummer Alan White in the midst of rivalry with Britpop peers Blur in the charts. The Gallagher brothers featured regularly in tabloid newspapers for their sibling disputes and wild lifestyles. In 1997, Oasis released their third album, Be Here Now, and although it became the fastest-selling album in UK chart history, the album’s popularity tapered off quickly. The band lost members Paul McGuigan and Paul Arthurs as they went on to record and release Standing on the Shoulder of Giants in 2000 and were replaced by Gem Archer and Andy Bell who joined the group for the tour in support of Giants. The band found renewed success and popularity starting with 2005′s Don’t Believe the Truth.

In August 2009, Noel Gallagher announced his departure from the band after a backstage altercation with Liam before a festival appearance The band, comprising the remaining members of Oasis and led by Liam Gallagher, decided to continue working together under the name Beady Eye, while Noel went on to form his solo project Noel Gallagher’s High Flying Birds.

In 2014 Beady Eye split up, however In 2015 Liam Gallagher appeared at an Irish pub in Charlestown, County Mayo playing a number of songs, including an early version of his new song ‘Bold’, in front of pub guests with an acoustic guitar. Gallagher also appeared solo at the Norwegian festival Bergenfest in 2017 And released his solo debut single “Wall of Glass” and Liam Gallagher performed his first solo concert at the Ritz in Manchester with all proceeds going to victims of the Manchester terror attack. Gallagher also made a surprise appearance at the One Love Manchester benefit concert where he played “Rock ‘N’ Roll Star”, “Wall of Glass” and “Live Forever” with Coldplay’s Chris Martin and Jonny Buckland. Gallagher also performed at the Rock am Ring festival in Germany, the Pinkpop festival in the Netherlands and the Glastonbury Festival, Singing “Don’t Look Back in Anger” and dedicating his performance to the victims of the Manchester and London terror attacks and the Grenfell Tower fire. He also released his second solo single “Chinatown” and performed at the Exit festival in Serbia, Benicassim festival in Spain and Lollapalooza festival in Chicago but left the stage in the middle of a song after performing for only 20 minutes. He later apologized on Twitter and claimed he had vocal problems. Gallagher later released the song “For What It’s Worth” which Gallagher described as an “apology” saying “…I’ve made a lot of mistakes…I guess it is an apology to whoever. I’ve pissed a lot of people off”.  Liam Gallagher is due to release his debut solo album “As You Were” in October 2017.

Stephen King

American author of contemporary horror, suspense, science fiction and fantasy Stephen Edwin King was born September 21, 1947 . His books have sold more than 350 million copies and have been adapted into a number of feature films, television movies and comic books. King has published 50 novels, including seven under the pen-name ofRichard Bachman, and five non-fiction books. He has written nearly two hundred short stories, most of which have been collected in nine collections of short fiction. Many of his stories are set in his home state of Maine.King has received Bram Stoker Awards, World Fantasy Awards, British Fantasy SocietyAwards, his novella The Way Station was a Nebula Award novelette nominee, and his short story “The Man in the Black Suit” received the O. Henry Award. In 2003, the National Book Foundation awarded him the Medal for Distinguished Contribution to American Letters. He has also received awards for his contribution to literature for his whole career, such as the World Fantasy Award for Life Achievement (2004), the Canadian Booksellers Association Lifetime Achievement Award 2007 and the Grand Master Award from the Mystery Writers of America (2007)

Some have suggested that king may have been psychologically inspired to write horror when, as a child, King apparently witnessed one of his friends being struck and killed by a train, after which King returned, speechless and seemingly in shock. Only later did the family learn of the friend’s death. King also compared his sudden inspiration for writing horror to his uncle’s successfully dowsing for water. He Was also inspired by an H. P. Lovecraft collection of short stories, entitled The Lurker in the Shadows, that had belonged to his father. The cover art featured an illustration of a yellow-green demon hiding within the recesses of a Hellish cavern beneath a tombstone.

King attended Durham Elementary School and graduated from Lisbon Falls High School, in Lisbon Falls, Maine. He displayed an early interest in horror as an avid reader of EC’s horror comics, including Tales from the Crypt. He began writing for fun while still in school, contributing articles to Dave’s Rag, the newspaper his brother published, and later began selling to his friends stories based on movies he had seen (though when discovered by his teachers, he was forced to return the profits). The first of his stories to be independently published was “I Was a Teenage Grave Robber”; it was serialized over four issues of a fanzine, Comics Review, in 1965. That story was published the following year in a revised form as “In a Half-World of Terror” in another fanzine, Stories of Suspense.

From 1966, King studied English at the University of Maine, graduating in 1970 with a Bachelor of Arts in English. That same year, his first daughter, Naomi Rachel, was born. He wrote a column for the student newspaper, The Maine Campus, titled “Steve King’s Garbage Truck”, took part in a writing workshop organized by Burton Hatlen, and took odd jobs to pay for his studies. He sold his first professional short story, “The Glass Floor”, to Startling Mystery Stories in 1967.After leaving the university, King earned a certificate to teach high school but, initially supplemented his wage by selling short stories to men’s magazines such as Cavalier. Many of which have been republished in the collection Night Shift. In 1971, King married Tabitha Spruce, whom he had met at the University’s Fogler Library after one of Professor Hatlen’s workshops. King was hired as a teacher at Hampden Academy in Hampden, Maine. He continued to contribute short stories to magazines and worked on ideas for novels.

In the 1970s, King began what became a series of interconnected stories about a lone gunslinger, Roland, who pursues the “Man in Black” in an alternate-reality universe that is a cross between J. R. R. Tolkien’s Middle-earth and the American Wild West as depicted by Clint Eastwood and Sergio Leone in their spaghetti Westerns. The first of these stories, The Dark Tower: The Gunslinger, was initially published in five installments by The Magazine of Fantasy & Science Fiction from 1977 to 1981. The Gunslinger was continued as an eight-book epic series called The Dark Tower, which books King wrote and published infrequently over four decades ]In 1987, King released the second installment, The Dark Tower II: The Drawing of the Three, in which Roland draws three people from 20th-century United States into his world through magical doors. A hardcover limited edition of the revised version of The Gunslinger along with a prequel story set in the Dark Tower world called “The Little Sisters of Eluria” was also published (which was originally published in 1998 in the collection Legends: Short Novels by the Masters of Modern Fantasy) in 2009.

In 2005, King signed a deal with Marvel Comics to publish a seven-issue limited series spin-off of the series called The Gunslinger Born. The series, which focuses on a young Roland Deschain, was plotted by Robin Furth, with dialogue by Peter David, and illustrated by Eisner Award-winning artist Jae Lee. The first issue was published on February 7, 2007, and King, David, Lee, and Marvel Editor-in-Chief Joe Quesada appeared at a midnight signing at a Times Square, New York comic book store to promote it. The work had sold over 200,000 copies by March 2007. The success of The Gunslinger Born led to an ongoing miniseries published by Marvel, with Furth and David continuing to collaborate, featuring both adapted material from the Dark Tower books and new material approved by King; it also led to a second series of King adaptations in the same format, serializing the events of The Stand. In 2008, King published both a novel, Duma Key, and a collection, Just After Sunset. The latter featured 13 short stories, including a novella, N., which was later released as a serialized animated series And adopted into a limited comic book series.

In 2009, King published Ur, a novella written exclusively for the launch of the second-generation Amazon Kindle and available only on Amazon.com, and Throttle, a novella co-written with his son Joe Hill, and released later as an audiobook Road Rage, which included Richard Matheson’s short story “Duel”. On November 10 that year, King’s novel Under the Dome was published. It is a reworking of an unfinished novel he tried writing twice in the late 1970s and early 1980s, and at 1,074 pages, it is the largest novel he has written since 1986’s It. It debuted at No. 1 in The New York Times Bestseller List.

In 2010 King published a collection of four previously unpublished novellas called Full Dark, No Stars, an original novella called Blockade Billy, and A monthly comic book series called American Vampire, written by King with short-story writer Scott Snyder, and illustrated by Rafael Albuquerque. In it King wrote the background history of the very first American vampire, Skinner Sweet, and Scott Snyder wrote the story of Pearl. King’s next novel, 11/22/63, was published in, 2011, and was nominated for the 2012 World Fantasy Award Best Novel. The eighth Dark Tower volume, The Wind Through the Keyhole, was published in 2012. King’s next book Joyland, is about “an amusement-park serial killer”, and was, published In 2012, followed by the sequel to The Shining (1977), titled Doctor Sleep, published September 2013. His novel Under the Dome has also been adapted for television and A movie adaptation of The Dark Tower is also being released in 2017. A remake of IT has also been made. There is also a television series in the works based on the Dark Tower due to air 2018, of between 10 and 13 episodes, starring Idris Elba and Tom Taylor. The show’s central story, will take place many years before the events depicted in the film and focuses on Roland Deschain’s teenage years, as outlined in the series’ fourth book, Wizard and Glass.

Don Felder (The Eagles)

Best known for his work as lead guitarist for the Eagles from 1974 to 1980 and again from 1994 to 2001, the American musician andsongwriter, Donald William “Don” Felder was born September 21, 1947. The Eagles are an American rock band formed in Los Angeles, California in 1971 byGlenn Frey, Don Henley, Bernie Leadon, and Randy Meisner.With seven number-one singles, six Grammys, five American Music Awards, and six number one albums, the Eagles were one of the most successful musical acts of the 1970s. At the end of the 20th century, two of their albums, Their Greatest Hits (1971–1975) and Hotel California, ranked among the 20 best-selling albums in the U.S.according to the Recording Industry Association of America. Hotel California is ranked 37th in Rolling Stone’s list of “The 500 Greatest Albums of All Time”, and the band was ranked No. 75 on the magazine’s 2004 list of the 100 Greatest Artists of All Time.They are one of the world’s best-selling bands of all time, having sold over 150 million records—100 million in the U.S. alone—including 42 million copies of Their Greatest Hits (1971–1975) and 32 million copies of Hotel California. They are the fifth-highest-selling music act and highest-selling American band in US history. No American band sold more records than the Eagles during the 1970s.The Eagles released their self-titled debut album in 1972, which spawned three Top 40 singles: “Take It Easy”, “Witchy Woman”, and “Peaceful Easy Feeling”.

Their next album,Desperado (1973), was less successful than the first, reaching only No. 41 on the charts; neither of its singles reached the Top 40. However, the album contained two of the band’s most popular tracks: “Desperado” and “Tequila Sunrise”. They released On the Border in 1974, adding guitarist Don Felder midway through the recording of the album. The album generated two Top 40 singles: “Already Gone” and their first Number One, “Best of My Love”.It was not until 1975’s One of These Nights that the Eagles became arguably America’s biggest band. The album included three Top 5 singles: “One of These Nights”, “Lyin’ Eyes”, and “Take It to the Limit”, the first of which hitting the top of the charts. They continued that success and hit their commercial peak in late 1976 with the release ofHotel California, which would go on to sell over 16 million copies in the U.S. alone and over 32 million copies worldwide. The album yielded two number-one singles, “New Kid in Town” and “Hotel California”. They released their last studio album for nearly 28 years in 1979 with The Long Run, which spawned three Top 10 singles: “Heartache Tonight”, “The Long Run”, and “I Can’t Tell You Why”, the lead single being another chart-topping hit.The Eagles disbanded in July 1980 but reunited in 1994 for the album Hell Freezes Over, a mix of live and new studio tracks. They have toured intermittently since then and were inducted into the Rock and Roll Hall of Fame in 1998. In 2007, the Eagles released Long Road Out of Eden, their first full studio album in 28 years. The album would top the album charts, release five singles to the Adult Contemporary Charts, and win the band two Grammys. The next year they launched the Long Road Out of Eden Tour in support of the album. The band members have discussed the possibility of making another album.On April 1, 2013, during a concert at Casino Rama in Rama, Ontario, Don Henley announced a tour in support of the band’s documentary release, History of the Eagles.

Following the 1980 breakup of the Eagles, Felder focused more on his family but also embarked on a solo career, concentrating on film composition and session work. He worked on The Bee Gees’ 1981 album Living Eyes as a session guitarist. Through his association with Bee Gees’ producer Albhy Galuten, Felder also made session appearances on albums by artists as diverse as Diana Ross, Barbra Streisand and Andy Gibb. During this time, he also contributed guitar work to Stevie Nicks’ first two solo albums.Among his musical film credits in the 1980s are two songs on the soundtrack to the 1981 animated cult film Heavy Metal entitled “Heavy Metal (Takin’ a Ride)” (with former bandmates Don Henley and Timothy B. Schmit contributing backing vocals) and “All of You” – with Jefferson Starship’s Mickey Thomas as backing vocalist, as well as the title track “Wild Life” from the 1985 motion picture adaptation of Neil Simon’s “The Sluggers Wife.” He also penned the song “She’s Got A Part Of Me” from the soundtrack to the 1985 romantic comedy Secret Admirer.Felder’s television credits include FTV, a musical comedy show which he hosted from 1985–1986, and Galaxy High, the 1986 CBScartoon series for which he scored and performed all of the music, including the series’ catchy theme song.

In1983, Felder released his first solo album entitled Airborne. The album’s single “Never Surrender,” co-written with Kenny Loggins, was a minor hit, having also appeared on the soundtrack to the popular motion picture teen comedy Fast Times at Ridgemont High. Nearly three decades later, on October 9, 2012, his second solo album Road to Forever was released, with “Fall from the Grace of Love” chosen as the lead single.Throughout his career, Felder is best known for his iconic live performances using the Gibson Les Paul and Gibson EDS-1275 electric guitars. This prompted the Gibson Guitar Corporation to honor him in 2010 with two signature re-issues, the “Don Felder Hotel California 1959 Les Paul” and the “Don Felder Hotel California EDS-1275.” Felder himself is an avid guitar collector, having amassed close to 300 models since childhood. He almost sold his 1953/1954 Gibson Les Paul Gold Top at Manny’s Music Shop while living in New York in 1970, but the offer was too low. Felder estimates that the guitar was worth between $3,000 to $4,000 at the time, and Manny’s offered him between $150 and $300. To this day he has never sold any guitar he has owned.Felder currently tours with his own band. Heavy metal (taking a ride) is also featured in the South Park episode “Major Boobage”

Leonard Cohen

Canadian Juno Award-winning singer-songwriter, musician, poet, and novelist Leonard Norman Cohen, CC GOQ was born 21 September 1934 . His work often explores religion, isolation, sexuality, and personal relationships. Cohen has been inducted into the American Rock and Roll Hall of Fame and both the Canadian Music Hall of Fame and theCanadian Songwriters Hall of Fame. He is also a Companion of the Order of Canada, the nation’s highest civilian honour. In 2011 Cohen received a Prince of Asturias Award for literature.

The critic Bruce Eder said this of Cohen’s overall career in popular music: “Cohen is one of the most fascinating and enigmatic … singer/songwriters of the late ’60s … and has retained an audience across four decades of music-making … Second only to Bob Dylan (and perhaps Paul Simon), he commands the attention of critics and younger musicians more firmly than any other musical figure from the 1960s who is still working at the outset of the 21st century.

The Academy of American Poets has commented more broadly on Cohen’s overall career in the arts, including his work as a poet, novelist, and songwriter, stating that Cohen’s successful blending of poetry, fiction, and music is made most clear in Stranger Music: Selected Poems and Songs, published in 1993, which gathered more than two hundred of Cohen’s poems … several novel excerpts, and almost sixty song lyrics … While it may seem to some that Leonard Cohen departed from the literary in pursuit of the musical, his fans continue to embrace him as a Renaissance man who straddles the elusive artistic borderlines.

Cohen’s first album was Songs of Leonard Cohen (1967) followed by Songs from a Room (1969) (featuring the often-recorded “Bird on the Wire”) and Songs of Love and Hate (1971). His 1977 record Death of a Ladies’ Man was co-written and produced by Phil Spector, which was a move away from Cohen’s previous minimalist sound. In 1979 Cohen returned with the more traditional Recent Songs, which blended his acoustic style with jazz and Oriental and Mediterranean influences. “Hallelujah” was first released on Cohen’s studio album Various Positions in 1984. I’m Your Man in 1988 marked Cohen’s turn to synthesized productions and remains his most popular album. In 1992 Cohen released its follow-up, The Future, which had dark lyrics and references to political and social unrest.

Cohen returned to music in 2001 with the release of Ten New Songs, which was a major hit in Canada and Europe. His eleventh album, Dear Heather, followed in 2004. After a successful string of tours between 2008 and 2010, Cohen released three albums in the final four years of his life: Old Ideas (2012), Popular Problems (2014) and You Want It Darker (2016). Leonard Cohen sadly passed away on 7 November 2016 at the age of 82 at his home in Los Angeles. A memorial is planned to take place in Los Angeles at a future date. Cohen was survived by his two children and two grandchildren. Tributes were paid by numerous stars and political figures. His final album You Want it Darker  was released three weeks before his death.