BAFTA Nominations 2018

NOMINATIONS for the 2018 British Academy of Film and Television Awards, Hosted by Joanna Lumley

Best film
Call Me By Your Name
Darkest Hour
Dunkirk
The Shape Of Water
Three Billboards Outside Ebbing, Missouri
Outstanding British film
Darkest Hour
The Death of Stalin
God’s Own Country
Lady Macbeth
Paddington 2
Three Billboards Outside Ebbing, Missouri
Best Director
Blade Runner 2049 – Denis Villeneuve
Call Me By Your Name – Luca Guadagnino
Dunkirk – Christopher Nolan
The Shape Of Water – Guillermo Del Toro
Three Billboards Outside Ebbing, Missouri – Martin McDonagh
Best Leading actress
Annette Bening – Film Stars Don’t Die In Liverpool
Frances McDormand – Three Billboards Outside Ebbing, Missouri
Margot Robbie – I, Tonya
Sally Hawkins – The Shape Of Water
Saoirse Ronan – Lady Bird
Best Leading actor
Daniel Day-Lewis – Phantom Thread
Daniel Kaluuya – Get Out
Gary Oldman – Darkest Hour
Jamie Bell – Film Stars Don’t Die In Liverpool
Timothee Chalamet – Call Me By Your Name

Best Supporting actress
Allison Janney – I, Tonya
Kristin Scott Thomas – Darkest Hour
Laurie Metcalf – Lady Bird
Lesley Manville – Phantom Thread
Octavia Spencer – The Shape Of Water

Best Supporting actor
Christopher Plummer – All The Money In The World
Hugh Grant – Paddington 2
Sam Rockwell – Three Billboards Outside Ebbing, Missouri
Willem Dafoe – The Florida Project
Woody Harrelson – Three Billboards Outside Ebbing, Missouri
Shape of Water leads Bafta nominations

EE Rising Star Award (voted for by the public)
Daniel Kaluuya
Florence Pugh
Josh O’Connor
Tessa Thompson
Timothee Chalamet

Outstanding debut by a British writer, director or producer
The Ghoul
I am Not A Witch
Jawbone
Kingdom Of Us
Lady Macbeth

Best Film not in the English language
Elle
First They Killed My Father
The Handmaiden
Loveless
The Salesman
Documentary
City Of Ghosts
I Am Not Your Negro
Icarus
An Inconvenient Sequel
Jane

Best Animated film
Coco
Loving Vincent
My Life As A Courgette
Original screenplay
Get Out
I, Tonya
Lady Bird
The Shape Of Water
Three Billboards Outside Ebbing, Missouri

Best Adapted screenplay
Call Me By Your Name
The Death Of Stalin
Film Stars Don’t Die In Liverpool
Molly’s Game
Paddington 2

Best Original music
Blade Runner 2049 – Benjamin Wallfisch, Hans Zimmer
Darkest Hour – Dario Marianelli
Dunkirk – Hans Zimmer
Phantom Thread – Jonny Greenwood
The Shape Of Water – Alexandre Desplat

Cinematography
Blade Runner 2049 – Roger Deakins
Darkest Hour – Bruno Delbonnel
Dunkirk – Hoyte van Hoytema
The Shape of Water – Dan Laustsen
Three Billboards Outside Ebbing, Missouri – Ben Davis

Editing
Baby Driver – Jonathan Amos, Paul Machliss
Blade Runner 2049 – Joe Walker
Dunkirk – Lee Smith
The Shape Of Water – Sidney Wolinsky
Three Billboards Outside Ebbing, Missouri – Jon Gregory

Production and design
Beauty And The Beast – Sarah Greenwood, Katie Spencer
Blade Runner 2049 – Dennis Gassner, Alessandra Querzola
Darkest Hour – Sarah Greenwood, Katie Spencer
Dunkirk – Nathan Crowley, Gary Fettis
The Shape Of Water – Paul Austerberry, Jeff Melvin, Shane Vieau

Best Costume design
Beauty And The Beast – Jacqueline Durran
Darkest Hour – Jacqueline Durran
I, Tonya – Jennifer Johnson
Phantom Thread – Mark Bridges
The Shape Of Water – Luis Sequeira

Make-up and hair
Blade Runner 2049 – Donald Mowat, Kerry Warn
Darkest Hour – David Malinowski, Ivana Primorac, Lucy Sibbick, Kazuhiro Tsuji
I, Tonya – Deborah La Mia Denaver, Adruitha Lee
Victoria & Abdul – Daniel Phillips
Wonder – Naomi Bakstad, Robert A Pandini, Arjen Tuiten

Sound
Baby Driver – Tim Cavagin, Mary H. Ellis, Julian Slater
Blade Runner 2049 – Ron Bartlett, Doug Hemphill, Mark Mangini, Mac Ruth
Dunkirk – Richard King, Gregg Landaker, Gary A. Rizzo, Mark Weingarten
The Shape Of Water – Christian Cooke, Glen Gauthier, Nathan Robitaille, Brad Zoern
Star Wars: The Last Jedi – Ren Klyce, David Parker, Michael Semanick, Stuart Wilson, Matthew Wood

Special visual effects
Blade Runner 2049 – Gerd Nefzer, John Nelson
Dunkirk – Scott Fisher, Andrew Jackson
The Shape Of Water – Dennis Berardi, Trey Harrell, Kevin Scott
Star Wars: The Last Jedi – Nominees TBC
War For The Planet Of The Apes – Nominees TBC

British short animation
Have Heart
Mamoon
Poles Apart
British short film
Aamir
Cowboy Dave
A Drowning Man
Work
Wren Boys

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Golden Globes 2018

FILM

  • Best motion picture, drama: Three Billboards Outside Ebbing, Missouri
  • Best motion picture, musical or comedy: Lady Bird
  • Best director, motion picture: Guillermo del Toro, The Shape of Water
  • Best performance by an actress in a motion picture, drama: Frances McDormand, Three Billboards Outside Ebbing, Missouri
  • Best performance by an actor in a motion picture, drama: Gary Oldman, Darkest Hour
  • Best performance by an actress in a motion picture, musical or comedy: Saoirse Ronan, Lady Bird
  • Best performance by an actor in a motion picture, musical or comedy: James Franco, The Disaster Artist
  • Best performance by an actress in a supporting role in any motion picture: Allison Janney, I, Tonya
  • Best performance by an actor in a supporting role in any motion picture: Sam Rockwell, Three Billboards Outside Ebbing, Missouri
  • Best screenplay, motion picture: Martin McDonagh, Three Billboards Outside Ebbing, Missouri
  • Best motion picture, animated: Coco
  • Best motion picture, foreign language: In the Fade
  • Best original score, motion picture: Alexandre Desplat, The Shape of Water
  • Best original song, motion picture: “This Is Me,” The Greatest Showman

TELEVISION

  • Best television series, drama: The Handmaid’s Tale
  • Best performance by an actress in a television series, drama: Elisabeth Moss, The Handmaid’s Tale
  • Best performance by an actor in a television series, drama: Sterling K. Brown, This Is Us
  • Best television series, musical or comedy: The Marvelous Mrs. Maisel
  • Best performance by an actress in a television series, musical or comedy: Rachel Brosnahan, The Marvelous Mrs. Maisel
  • Best performance by an actor in a television series, musical or comedy: Aziz Ansari, Master of None
  • Best television limited series or motion picture made for television: Big Little Lies
  • Best performance by an actress in a limited series or motion picture made for television: Nicole Kidman, Big Little Lies
  • Best performance by an actor in a limited series or motion picture made for television: Ewan McGregor, Fargo
  • Best performance by an actress in a supporting role in a series, limited series or motion picture made for television: Laura Dern, Big Little Lies
  • Best performance by an actor in a supporting role in a series, limited series or motion picture made for television: Alexander Skarsgard, Big Little Lies

International Typing Day

Typing Day (also known as International Typing Day or World Typing Day) is an annual event that falls on 8 January in Malaysia. This date was chosen because it is one week after new year Which gives people enough time to think through and plan what they want to do for the following year and write it down on this day. For example, documents and ideas like resolution of the past year, vision, mission and objective for this year, compilations of ideas, opinions of the previous years etc. can be produced and shared with other. Typing Day was created in Malaysia and was co-organized by the STC (Speed Typing Contest) Team from JCI (Junior Chamber International) Mines and Team TAC (Typo Auto Corrector) to promote speed, accuracy and efficiency in written communication among the public.

Typing Day was first celebrated in 2011 with the aim of encouraging people to express themselves via written communication and also in commemoration of the Malaysian Speed Typing Contest 2011, which broke two records in the Malaysian Book of Records (MBR) i.e. the Fastest Typist and the Largest Participation for a Typing Event. Typing Day was originally conceived by Team TAC (Typo Auto Corrector), which consist of Jay Chong Yen Jye, Nicholas Koay Zhen Lin and Edwin Khong Wai Howe, the winner of the MSC Malaysia-IHL Business Plan Competition (MIBPC) 2010/2011’s Business Plan Category. With the aspiration to encourage everyday people especially the younger generation to type and learn proper English, Team TAC has designed and developed the SecondKey, a computer program that automatically corrects wrong English spellings in virtually any online and offline type-written interface (i.e. social network sites, word processing programs, etc.) Working closely together with Microsoft Malaysia, the software is currently being improved and expanded beyond the English language; with various add on features to enhance typing accuracy and efficiency.

Global Family Day

Global Family Day, (One Day of Peace and Sharing) is celebrated every January 1 in the United States and around the world as a global day of peace and sharing. It is a day where individuals and families share food with friends (especially the needy), make personal pledges of nonviolence, and spread a message of peace and sharing by ringing bells or beating a drum in hopes of making society and the world a safer place to live. Global Family Day grew out of the United Nations Millennium celebration, “One Day In Peace.”

Originally supported in the United States by Linda Grover, the original idea itself is difficult to pin down because many grassroots efforts around the world had independently sprung up to target this date as a day for peace and had worked separately to prevail on local governments and the U.N. to establish such a day. These efforts included a 1996 children’s book “One Day In Peace, January 1, 2000″ by Steve Diamond and Robert Alan Silverstein, which was translated into 22 languages. As a result, nearly 140 nations were poised to respond to the November 1997 declaration of the U.N. General Assembly that the first year of the new millennium should launch an “International Decade for the Culture of Peace & Nonviolence for the Children of the World” which would be ushered in by “One Day of Peace.”

Finally, in November 1999, the U.N. issued a formal invitation for world participation. As the independent grassroots organizations around the world joined the effort, one notable outcome was a special ceremony initiated by Gerry Eitner between Israeli and Palestinian families, at a refugee camp in Nablus. Later that year, the United States Congress followed the U.N. initiative and unanimously voted to establish the first day of every year as a special time of peace and sharing. In 2001, the United Nations General Assembly established this Observance as a recurring annual event, also recommending that all Member states recognize the new holiday To date, more than 20 heads of state and many ambassadors have endorsed what has now become known as Global Family Day. Global Family Day has twice received the unanimous support of the U.S. Congres, the UN General Assembly (Resolutions, and more than 30 sitting heads of state and ambassadors representing more than two-thirds of the world’s population.

People of the United States have been urged to observe Global Family Day and One Day of Peace and Sharing by the President who issues an annual proclamation, calling upon the people of the United States to observe Global Family Day, One Day of Peace and Sharing, and for other purposes.In 2005, Dr. Milton A. Reid and Cassandra West, Chairman and President respectively of the Dr. Martin Luther King, Jr. Family Life Institute, were invited to the United Nations for the support of Global Family Day for the International Day of Families. On September 26, 2006, President George W. Bush issued a Presidential Proclamation for Family Day, as special request, of the Dr. Martin Luther King, Jr. Family Life Institute, to the White House, Faith Based Initiatives office. The organization’s mission is to unite, inform, motivate, and connect people, institutions, and governments of the world through the celebration of this day of peace and sharing every January 1 and related year-around programs.

world day of Peace

Not to be confused with World Peace Day, which takes place in September, The World Day of Peace is a feast day of the Roman Catholic Church dedicated to universal peace, held on 1 January, the Solemnity of Mary, Mother of God. Bl. Pope Paul VI established it in 1967, being inspired by the encyclical Pacem in Terris of Pope St. John XXIII and with reference to his own encyclical Populorum Progressio. The day was first observed on 1 January 1968.

World Day of Peace often has been an occasion on which the Popes made magisterial declarations of social doctrine. Bl. Pope Paul VI and Pope St. John Paul II made important declarations on the Day in each year of their pontificates regarding the United Nations, human rights, women’s rights, labor unions, economic development, the right to life, international diplomacy, peace in the Holy Land (Israel), globalization, and terrorism. In England and Wales, “Peace Sunday” is traditionally observed on the Second Sunday of Ordinary Time, which is the Sunday occurring between 14 and 20 January, inclusive. The British branch of the Pax Christi movement annually provides new literature concerning the World Day of Peace.

Public Domain Day

Public Domain describes when the Copyright protection of various works expires and this work enters into the Public Domain. This legal transition usually happens annually on 1 January which has since been declared Public Domain Day. The observance of a “Public Domain Day” was initially informal; the earliest known mention was in 2004 by Wallace McLean (a Canadian public domain activist), with support for the idea echoed by Lawrence Lessig. As of 1 January 2010 a Public Domain Day website lists the authors whose works are entering the public domain. There are activities in countries around the world by various organizations all under the banner Public Domain Day.

Public Domain concerns the expiry ofCopyright protection terms which are typically described as the life of the author plus a certain number of years after his or her death (or pma: post mortem auctoris). In many jurisdictions, this usually means that 70 years have passed since the day of author’s death. After that period, the works of those authors become fully available so that everyone – without any need for prior authorization – can access and use them for any purpose whatsoever. Legally, this happens on New Year’s Day (January 1). That means that in those countries, the works of authors who died, anywhere in the world, in 1936, passed into public domain on 1 January 2007.

Since public domain rights vary based on jurisdiction, the passage of a work into the public domain is not worldwide. The most noticeable exception is the United States, where no additional published works will enter the public domain automatically until 2019. Australia’s copyright scheme is even more restrictive, with no Public Domain Day possible until 2026. In Europe various works will pass into the public domain, as will Canada and New Zealand. Many more works would be entering the public domain if not for the copyright extension that has occurred several times in the past several decades.

Public Domain Day in 2010 celebrated the entry to the public domain in many countries of the works of authors such as Sigmund Freud, William Butler Yeats, Ford Madox Ford and Arthur Rackham. In 2011 it celebrated the public domain status of Isaac Babel, Walter Benjamin, John Buchan, Mikhail Bulgakov, F. Scott Fitzgerald, Emma Goldman, Paul Klee, Selma Lagerlof, Leon Trotsky, Vito Volterra, Nathanael West, and others.

New Years Day

New Year’s Day is observed annually on January 1. It is the first day of the year on the modern Gregorian calendar as well as the Julian calendar used in ancient Rome. With most countries using the Gregorian calendar as their main calendar, New Year’s Day is the closest thing to being the world’s only truly global public holiday, often celebrated with fireworks at the stroke of midnight as the new year starts. January 1 on the Julian calendar currently corresponds to January 14 on the Gregorian calendar, and it is on that date that followers of some of the Eastern Orthodox churches celebrate the New Year. New Year’s Day is also a postal holiday in the United States.

The Romans dedicated New Year’s Day to the two headed God Janus, the god of gates, doors, and beginnings for whom the first month of the year (January) is also named. After Julius Caesar reformed the calendar in 46 BC and was subsequently murdered, the Roman Senate voted to deify him on the 1st January 42 BC in honor of his life and his institution of the new rationalized calendar. The month originally owes its name to the deity Janus, who had two faces, one looking forward and the other looking backward. This suggests that New Year’s celebrations are founded on pagan traditions. Some have suggested this occurred in 153 BC, when it was stipulated that the two annual consuls (after whose names the years were identified) entered into office on that day, though no consensus exists on the matter. Dates in March, coinciding with the spring equinox, or commemorating the Annunciation of Jesus, along with a variety of Christian feast dates were used throughout the Middle Ages, though calendars often continued to display the months in columns running from January to December.

Among the 7th century pagans of Flanders and the Netherlands, it was the custom to exchange gifts at the New Year. This was a pagan custom deplored by Saint Eligius (died 659 or 660), who warned the Flemings and Dutchmen not to. Most countries in Western Europe officially adopted January 1 as New Year’s Day somewhat before they adopted the Gregorian calendar. In England, the Feast of the Annunciation on March 25, was the first day of the new year until the adoption of the Gregorian calendar in 1752. The March 25 date was known as Annunciation Style; the January 1 date was known as Circumcision Style, because this was the date of the Feast of the Circumcision, considered to be the eighth day of Christ’s life, counting from December 25 when his birth is celebrated. This day was christened as the beginning of the New Year by Pope Gregory as he designed the Liturgical Calendar. Celebrations Are held world-wide on January 1 as part of New Year’s Day.

During the Middle Ages under the influence of the Catholic Church, many countries in western Europe moved the start of the year to one of several important Christian festivals – December 25 (the Nativity of Jesus), March 1, March 25 (the Annunciation), or even Easter. Eastern European countries (most of them with populations showing allegiance to the Orthodox Church) began their numbered year on September 1 from about 988. In England, January 1 was celebrated as the New Year festival, but from the 12th century to 1752 the year in England began on March 25 (Lady Day). So, for example, the Parliamentary record notes the execution of Charles I as occurring on January 30, 1648, (as the year did not end until March 24), although modern histories adjust the start of the year to January 1 and record the execution as occurring in 1649.

Most western European countries subsequently changed the start of the year to January 1 before they adopted the Gregorian calendar. Scotland changed the start of the Scottish New Year to January 1 in 1600. England, Ireland and the British colonies changed the start of the year to January 1 in 1752. the Gregorian calendar was introduced throughout Britain and the British colonies.