Vitamin C Day

Vitamin C Day takes place annually on April 4th It was founded in 2003 to inform people and spread knowledge concerning the health benefits of vitamin C which is widely recognized for warding off colds. Vitamin C is also clinically proven to be beneficial in other areas of health, too.

Vitamin C, also known as ascorbic acid and ascorbate, is a vitamin found in various foods and sold as a dietary supplement. It is used to prevent and treat scurvy. Vitamin C is an essential nutrient involved in the repair of tissue and the enzymatic production of certain neurotransmitters. It is required for the functioning of several enzymes and is important for immune system function. It also functions as an antioxidant. Evidence does not support its use for the prevention of the common cold. There is, however, some evidence that regular use may shorten the length of colds It is unclear whether supplementation affects the risk of cancer, cardiovascular disease, or dementia. Although A recent study suggested that people with cognitive impairment, including Alzheimer’s disease and dementia, had lower vitamin C concentrations compared to people with normal cognition.

Vitamin C was discovered in 1912, isolated in 1928, and in 1933, was the first vitamin to be chemically produced. It is on the World Health Organization’s List of Essential Medicines, the safest and most effective medicines needed in a health system. Vitamin C is available as an inexpensive generic and over-the-counter medication. Partly for its discovery, Albert Szent-Györgyi and Walter Norman Haworth were awarded the 1937 Nobel Prizes in Physiology and Medicine and Chemistry, respectively. Foods containing vitamin C include citrus fruits, kiwifruit, guava, broccoli, Brussels sprouts, bell peppers and strawberries. Prolonged storage or cooking may reduce vitamin C content in food

Vitamin C is an essential nutrient for certain animals including humans. The term vitamin C encompasses several vitamers that have vitamin C activity in animals. Ascorbate salts such as sodium ascorbate and calcium ascorbate are used in some dietary supplements. These release ascorbate upon digestion which helps digest food. Vitamin C functions as a cofactor in many enzymatic reactions in animals (and humans) that mediate a variety of essential biological functions,

A deficiency of vitamin C can also cause The disease Scurvy, wherein Collagen by the body becomes too unstable to perform its functions which including wound healing and collagen synthesis. In addition several other enzymes in the body do not operate correctly without Vitamin C.Scurvy is characterized by spots on and bleeding under the skin, spongy gums, ‘corkscrew’ hair growth, and poor wound healing. Vitamin C also acts as an antioxidant (a reducing agent).

More International and National events happening 4 April

  • Victims of Violence Wholly Day takes place annually on 4 April To mark the anniversary of Dr. Martin Luther King’s assassination. 
  • School Librarian Day is celebrated on April 04, 2020. It honors all school librarians who serve young students so well in the local school libraries. 
  • International carrot day takes place annually on 4 April  it was founded 2003 to spread knowledge about the carrot and its health benefits

World Autism Awareness Day

World Autism Awareness Day takes place annually on 2 April. Every year, autism organizations around the world celebrate the day with unique fundraising and awareness-raising events. April is also Autism Awareness Month.

Autism is a lifelong developmental disability that manifests itself during the first three years of life. It results from a neurological disorder that affects the functioning of the brain, mostly affecting children and adults in many countries irrespective of gender, race or socio-economic status. It is characterized by impairments in social interaction, problems with verbal and non-verbal communication and restricted, repetitive behaviour, interests and activities. However because of this difference many autistic people show incredible abilities in other areas, such as Art and Maths, where repetitive patterns often occur.

The rate of autism in all regions of the world is high and it has a tremendous impact on children, their families, communities and societies. It can bring significant economic hardships to families, given the lack of health resources often found in developing countries. The stigmatization and discrimination associated with these illnesses also remain substantial obstacles to diagnosis and treatment. The absence of autism spectrum disorders and other mental disorders among children from lists of the leading causes of death has contributed to their long-term neglect by both public policy-makers in developing countries, as well as donors.

The Convention on the Rights of Persons with Disabilities entered into force in May 2008. Its purpose is to promote, protect and ensure the full and equal enjoyment of all human rights and fundamental freedoms by all persons with disabilities, and to promote respect for their inherent dignity. It is a solid tool to foster an inclusive and caring society for all and to ensure that all children and adults with autism can lead full and meaningful lives.The United Nations General Assembly unanimously declared 2 April as World Autism Awareness Day to highlight the need to help improve the lives of children and adults who suffer from the disorder.

Edible book day

The International Edible Book Festival is an annual event usually held on or around April 1, which is also known as Edible Book Day. The global event has been celebrated since 2000 in various parts of the world, where “edible books” are created, displayed, and small events are held. The creations are photographed and submitted to http://www.books2eat.com and then consumed.Regular contributors to the site are groups from Australia, Brazil, India, Italy, Japan, Luxembourg, Mexico, Morocco, The Netherlands, Russia, and Hong Kong. The event was initiated by Judith A. Hoffberg and Béatrice Coron in 2000. The official website Books2Eat.com says that the International Edible Book Festival is held to commemorate “the birthday of French gastronome Jean-Anthelme Brillat-Savarin (1755-1826), famous for his book Physiologie du goût, a witty meditation on food,” though April Fools’ Day is also related as “the perfect day to eat your words and play with them as the ‘books’ are consumed on the day of the event.”(See: the Phantom Tollbooth, as regards eating ones words.)

In 2005, the festival was a joint initiative of forum book art and the Museum of Work, Hamburg, where pastry chefs made edible books. The “book art” was displayed, photographed, and then eaten. In 2005, the event was celebrated in Los Angeles, too, at the Los Angeles Book Arts Center as the Annual International Edible Book High/Low Tea on April 2, where artists were encouraged to create and consume tomes. A 2006 Indianapolis Monthly described the Indianapolis festival as a “quirky event” held on April Fools’ Day, “celebrating both food and literature.” Participants created foods resembling literary titles.Loganberry Books in Shaker Heights, Ohio has held an edible books festival every April since 2004 In 2013, awards were given for Most Literary, Most Appetizing, Most Book-like, and Most Creative.

A University of Florida library holds the event as the Edible Book Contest in April, in connection with National Library Week. There are two rules for the contest: Entries should be edible, and they must somehow relate to a book. Besides edible books, other entries include “edible book trucks” and “edible bookmarks”. The event kicks off with viewing of the entries, each of which has an information card describing the book title, author, and creator of the book art. The “books” are judged by a panel of judges and by public voting. Awards are given in categories like: Most Creative, Least Edible, Best Overall Fiction, Best Overall Non-Fiction, and Best Children’s Book. In 2010, the event is planned to be held on April 15 and the award categories are: Best Overall Entry, Best Book Theme, Best Pun, Best Adult Book, and Best Children’s Book.

One library in the USA celebrated Banned Books Week 2008 by holding an Edible Book contest. The event invited guests to consume cooked dishes and baked goods that resembled covers of banned books or reflected their content. A reporter sums up the aptly named event: “Our celebration took Sir Francis Bacon’s famous words quite literally: ‘Some books are to be tasted, others to be swallowed, and the other few to be chewed and digested.’” In 2011, the British newspaper Metro ran a story that they would begin producing the newspaper on an edible “Sweet tasting paper” claiming to bring customers “news in the best possible taste”. The newspaper later clarified this was an April Fools’ joke.

International Transgender day of visibility

International Transgender Day of Visibility is an annual event occurring on March 31. Transgender refers to people who have a gender identity or gender expression that differs from their assigned sex. Transgender people are sometimes called transsexual if they desire medical assistance to transition from one sex to another. Transgender is also an umbrella term: in addition to including people whose gender identity is the opposite of their assigned sex (trans men and trans women), it may include people who are not exclusively masculine or feminine (people who are genderqueer or non-binary, including bigender, pangender, genderfluid, or agender. Other definitions of transgender also include people who belong to a third gender, or conceptualize transgender people as a third gender. Infrequently, the term transgender is defined very broadly to include cross-dressers, regardless of their gender identity.

Being transgender is independent of sexual orientation: transgender people may identify as heterosexual, homosexual, bisexual, asexual, or may decline to label their sexual orientation. The term transgender is also distinguished from intersex, a term that describes people born with physical sex characteristics “that do not fit typical binary notions of male or female bodies. The counterpart of transgender is cisgender, which describes persons whose gender identity or expression matches their assigned sex.

The degree to which individuals feel genuine, authentic, and comfortable within their external appearance and accept their genuine identity has been called transgender congruence. Many transgender people experience gender dysphoria, and some seek medical treatments such as hormone replacement therapy, sex reassignment surgery, or psychotherapy. Not all transgender people desire these treatments, and some cannot undergo them for financial or medical reasons. Most transgender people face discrimination in the workplace and in accessing public accommodations, and healthcare. In many places they are not legally protected from discrimination.

The International Transgender Day of Visibility is dedicated to celebrating transgender people and raising awareness of discrimination faced by transgender people worldwide. The holiday was founded by US-based transgender activist Rachel Crandall of Michigan in 2009. as a reaction to the lack of LGBT holidays celebrating transgender people, citing the frustration that the only well-known transgender-centered holiday was the Transgender Day of Remembrance which mourned the murders of transgender people, but did not acknowledge and celebrate living members of the transgender community. The first International Transgender Day of Visibility was held on March 31, 2009. It has since been spearheaded by the U.S.-based youth advocacy organization Trans Student Educational Resources. During 2014, the day was observed by activists across the world — including in Ireland and Scotland.

CESAR CHAVEZ DAY

Cesar Chavez Day takes place annually on 31 March. It Commemorates the anniversary of the birth of Cesar Chavez on 31 March 1927. Cesar Chavez, became leader of the United Farm Workers of America, the first union of migrant American farm workers; Cesar Chavez also organized the California grape boycott; and worked tirelessly for the 1975 collective bargaining act for farm workers passed by the California legislature, making it only the second State in the United States after Hawaii to do so.

CRAYOLA CRAYON DAY

Crayola Crayon Day also takes place annually on 31 March. It commemorates the date of 31 March 1903 when Binney & Smith Co begins making Crayola crayons.

EIFFEL TOWER DAY

Eiffel Tower Day also takes place annually on 31 March. Itcommemorates the date of 31 March 1889 when French engineer Alexandre Eiffel unfurled the French flag atop the completed Eiffel Tower as it was opened to the world. The Eiffel Tower is a wrought-iron lattice tower situated on the Champ de Mars in Paris, France. It is named after the engineer Gustave Eiffel, whose company designed and built the tower. It was Constructed between 1887 and 1889 as the entrance to the 1889 World’s Fair, it was initially criticised by some of France’s leading artists and intellectuals for its design, but it has become a global cultural icon of France and one of the most recognisable structures in the world. The Eiffel Tower is the most-visited paid monument in the world; 6.91 million people ascended it in 2015.

The tower is 324 metres (1,063 ft) tall, about the same height as an 81-storey building, and the tallest structure in Paris. Its base is square, measuring 125 metres (410 ft) on each side. During its construction, the Eiffel Tower surpassed the Washington Monument to become the tallest man-made structure in the world, a title it held for 41 years until the Chrysler Building in New York City was finished in 1930. Due to the addition of a broadcasting aerial at the top of the tower in 1957, it is now taller than the Chrysler Building by 5.2 metres (17 ft). Excluding transmitters, the Eiffel Tower is the second tallest free-standing structure in France after the Millau Viaduct.

The tower has three levels for visitors, with restaurants on the first and second levels. The top level’s upper platform is 276 m (906 ft) above the ground – the highest observation deck accessible to the public in the European Union. Tickets can be purchased to ascend by stairs or lift to the first and second levels. The climb from ground level to the first level is over 300 steps, as is the climb from the first level to the second. Although there is a staircase to the top level, it is usually accessible only by lift.

World Theatre Day

World Theatre Day is celebrated annually on 27th March by the International Theatre Institute (ITI) and the international theatre community and to mark the occasion Various national and international theatre events are organized. One of the most important of these is the circulation of the World Theatre Day International Message through which at the invitation of ITI, a figure of world stature shares his or her reflections on the theme of Theatre and a Culture of Peace. The first World Theatre Day International Message was written by Jean Cocteau (France) in 1962.

Theatre is a collaborative form of performing art that uses live performers, typically actors or actresses, to present the experience of a real or imagined event before a live audience in a specific place, often a stage. The performers may communicate this experience to the audience through combinations of gesture, speech, song, music, and dance. Elements of art, such as painted scenery and stagecraft such as lighting are used to enhance the physicality, presence and immediacy of the experience The specific place of the performance is also named by the word “theatre” as derived from the Ancient Greek θέατρον (théatron, “a place for viewing”), itself from θεάομαι (theáomai, “to see”, “to watch”, “to observe”).


Modern Western theatre is derived from the theatre of ancient Greece, and it borrows technical terminology, classification into genres, and many of its themes, stock characters, and plot elements. Theatre artist Patrice Pavis defines theatricality, theatrical language, stage writing and the specificity of theatre as synonymous expressions that differentiate theatre from the other performing arts, literature and the arts in general. Modern theatre includes performances of plays and musical theatre. Ballet and opera Are also considered theatre as they share many conventions such as acting, costumes and staging and were also influential to the development of musical theatre.

World Theatre day was proposed In 1961 at the 9th World Congress of the ITI by President Arvi Kivimaa on behalf of the Finnish Centre of the International Theatre Institute. Ever since, each year on the 27th March, World Theatre Day has been celebrated in many and varied ways by ITI National Centres throughout the world. Each year an important figure who has made a valuable contribution to either theatre or another field, is invited to share his or her reflections on theatre and international harmony. This International Message is then translated into more than 20 languages, read for tens of thousands of spectators before performances in theatres throughout the world and printed in hundreds of daily newspapers, with more than a hundred radio and television stations transmitting the Message to listeners all over the world.

Earth Hour

Earth Hour is a worldwide movement for the planet organized by the World Wide Fund for Nature (WWF). The event is held worldwide annually encouraging individuals, communities, households and businesses to turn off their non-essential lights for one hour, from 8:30 to 9:30 p.m. on the last Saturday in March, as a symbol for their commitment to the planet. It was famously started as a lights-off event in Sydney, Australia in 2007. Since then it has grown to engage more than 7000 cities and towns worldwide. Today, Earth Hour engages a massive mainstream community on a broad range of environmental issues. The one-hour event continues to remain the key driver of the now larger movement. Earth Hour 2014 was on Saturday, March 29, from 8:30 pm to 9:30 pm in a location’s local time. Earth Hour 2015 will be on Saturday, March 28, from 8:30 p.m. to 9:30 p.m. during participants’ local time.

It was started In 2004, when after confronted with scientific findings, WWF Australia met with advertising agency Leo Burnett Sydney to “discuss ideas for engaging Australians on the issue of climate change”. The idea of a large scale switch off was coined and developed in 2006, originally under the working title “The Big Flick”. WWF Australia presented their concept to Fairfax Media who, along with Sydney Lord Mayor Clover Moore, agreed to back the event. The 2007 Earth Hour was held on 31 March in Sydney, Australia at 7:30 pm, local time. In October 2007 San Francisco ran its own “Lights Out” program inspired by the Sydney Earth Hour.After their successful event in October, the organisers rallied behind Earth Hour 2008.

Since being introduced in 2008, Earth Hour has been celebrated Around the world: the Azrieli Center in Tel Aviv was darkened for Earth Hour 2010, the Colosseum in Rome was darkened for Earth Hour 2008. The Auditorio de Tenerife was also darkened for Earth Hour. According to WWF Thailand, Bangkok decreased electricity usage by 73.34 megawatts during Earth Hour which is equivalent to 41.6 tonnes of carbon Dioxide and Ontario used approximately 900 megawatt-hours less electrical energy during Earth Hour. The Golden Gate Bridge and Marin Headlands in San Francisco also turned off many public lights during Earth Hour. The Sky Tower in Auckland, New Zealand, also switched off its usual floodlighting during the Earth Hour, and re-lit afterwards. The Danish royal palaces, Amalienborg Palace and Gråsten Palace, went dark at the Queen’s command. Nelly Furtado held a free concert at Nathan Phillips Square in Downtown Toronto to celebrate Earth Hour.

Having The lights turned off During Earth Hour also presented an ideal opportunity of Astronomers to see the sky And Stargazing activities were held in Toronto’s Ontario Science Centre and Richmond Hill’s David Dunlap Observatory and Astronomy Ireland set up high-powered telescopes in Dublin’s Phoenix Park to allow people to take advantage of the night sky, normally swamped by bright city lights. Meanwhile In Tel Aviv, Israel, a free concert by Knesiyat Hasekhel was held at Rabin Square. Power needed for the concert was generated by a group of cyclists pushing pedal generators. The rest of the power was supplied by generators burning used falafel oil for power. In Atlanta, Georgia, the CEO of WWF US, Carter Roberts, and the Mayor of Atlanta, Shirley Franklin, flipped a giant switch on live TV, symbolically starting the wave of lights going out on the buildings around the city. In San Francisco, a public event hosted by WWF US was attended by Mayor Gavin Newsom, Gold medal figure skater Brian Boitano, Grateful Dead drummer Mickey Hart, and other celebrities. They gathered to watch the lights go out, listening to the music of Jason Damato. In Kuala Lumpur, Malaysia, the lights of the world’s tallest twin towers, the Petronas Towers, were turned off, while In Egypt, the lights went out on the Sphinx and the Great Pyramids of Giza from 8:30 to 9:30 pm.


More Holidays and events happening on 26 March

Make Up Your Own Holiday Day
Brothers’ and Sisters’ Day
Legal Assistants Day
National Nougat Day
National Spinach Day