Jackie Wilson

Energetic American soul singer and performer Jack Leroy Wilson Jr. tragically died on January 21, 1984, at age 49 from complications of pneumonia.

He was born on June 9, 1934, in Detroit, Michigan, Wilson often visited his family in Columbus and was greatly influenced by the choir at Billups Chapel. Growing up in the suburban Detroit enclave of Highland Park, Wilson joined a gang called the Shakers and often got himself in trouble. Wilson’s alcoholic father was frequently absent and usually unemployed. His parents separated shortly after Jackie’s ninth birthday. Jackie Wilson began singing as a youth, accompanying his mother, an excellent church choir singer. In his early teens he joined a quartet, the Ever Ready Gospel Singers, who gained popularity in local churches. Wilson was not very religious, but he enjoyed singing in public. The money the quartet earned from performing was often spent on alcohol, and Wilson began drinking at an early age.

Wilson dropped out of high school at age 15, having been sentenced to detention in the Lansing Corrections system for juveniles twice. During his second stint in detention, Wilson learned to box and began competing in the Detroit amateur circuit at age 16. Wilson’s record in the Golden Gloves was 2 and 8. After his mother forced Jackie to quit boxing, Wilson was forced by his father to marry Freda Hood, and he became a father at age 17. It is estimated that Wilson had fathered at least 10 other children before marrying Freda. He began working at Lee’s Sensation Club as a solo singer, then formed a group called the Falcons that included cousin Levi Stubbs, who later led the Four Tops. (Two other Wilson cousins, Hubert Johnson and Levi’s brother Joe, later became members of the Contours.) The other Falcons joined Hank Ballard as part of the Midnighters including Alonzo Tucker and Billy Davis, who worked with Wilson several years later as a solo artist. Tucker and Wilson collaborated as songwriters on a few songs Wilson recorded, including his 1963 hit “Baby Workout”.

Jackie Wilson was discovered by talent agent Johnny Otis, who recruited him for a group called the Thrillers. That group evolved into the Royals (who later became R&B group, the Midnighters, though Wilson was not part of the group. Wilson signed on with manager Al Green (not to be confused with R&B singer Al Green, nor Albert “Al” Green of the now defunct National Records). Green, who also managed LaVern Baker, Little Willie John, Johnnie Ray and Della Reese, owned two music publishing companies, Pearl Music and Merrimac Music, and Detroit’s Flame Show Bar, where Wilson met Baker. After recording Jackie Wilson’s first version of “Danny Boy” and a few other tracks on Dizzy Gillespie’s record label Dee Gee Records under the name Sonny Wilson (his nickname), Wilson joined a group called the Dominoes in 1953 to replace the immensely popular Clyde McPhatter, who left the Dominoes and formed the Drifters.

Before leaving the Dominoes, McPhatter coached Wilson on the sound Billy Ward wanted for his group, influencing Wilson’s singing style and stage presence. The 1940s Blues singer Roy Brown was also a major influence on him; and Wilson grew up listening to the Mills Brothers, the Ink Spots, Louis Jordan and Al Jolson. Wilson was the group’s lead singer for three years and In 1956 the Dominoes recorded Wilson with an unlikely interpretation of the pop hit “St. Therese of the Roses”,

In 1957 Jackie Wilson left the Dominoes, and collaborated with his cousin Levi, and secured performances at Detroit’s Flame Show Bar. Later, Al Green secured a deal with Decca Records, and Wilson was signed to its subsidiary label Brunswick and Wilson’s first single was released, “Reet Petite” (from his first album He’s So Fine), which became a modest R&B success (many years later, an international smash hit). “Reet Petite” was written by Berry Gordy Jr. (another former boxer who was a native son of Detroit), in which co-wrote “Reet Petite” with partner Roquel “Billy” Davis (often referred to as the pseudonym Tyran Carlo) and Gordy’s sister Gwendolyn. The trio composed and produced six additional singles for Wilson, in which were: “To Be Loved”, “I’m Wanderin'”, “We Have Love”, “That’s Why (I Love You So)”, “I’ll Be Satisfied” and “Lonely Teardrops”, which sold over one million copies, and established Wilson as an R&B superstar known for his extraordinary, operatic multi-octave vocal range, and was also awarded a gold disc by the RIAA.

Due to Wilson’s fervor when performing, with his dynamic dance moves, impassioned singing and impeccable dress, he was soon christened “Mr. Excitement”, a title Wilson kept for the remainder of his career. Jackie Wilson’s stagecraft in his live shows inspired James Brown, Michael Jackson and Elvis Presley, and many others. Presley was so impressed with Wilson that he made it a point to meet him, and the two instantly became good friends. In a photo of the two posing together, Presley’s caption in the autograph reads “You got you a friend for life”. Wilson was sometimes called “The Black Elvis”. Reportedly, when asked about this Presley said, “I guess that makes me the white Jackie Wilson.” Wilson also said he was influenced by Presley, saying,

Wilson’s powerful, electrifying live performances rarely failed to bring audiences to a state of frenzy. His live performances consisted of knee-drops, splits, spins, back-flips, one-footed across-the-floor slides, removing his tie and jacket and throwing them off the stage, basic boxing steps like advance and retreat shuffling, and one of his favorite routines, getting some of the less attractive women in the audience to come up to the stage and kiss him. Jackie Wilson was also a regular on TV, making regular appearances on such shows as The Ed Sullivan Show, American Bandstand, Shindig!, Shivaree and Hullabaloo. His only movie appearance was in the rock and roll film Go, Johnny, Go!, where he performed his 1959 hit song “You Better Know It”.

In 1958, Davis and Gordy left Wilson and Brunswick after royalty disputes escalated between them and Nat Tarnopol. Davis soon became a successful staff songwriter and producer for Chess Records, while Gordy borrowed money from his family and used money he earned from royalties writing for Wilson to start his own recording studio, Hitsville USA, the foundation of Motown Records in his native Detroit. Meanwhile, convinced that Wilson could venture out of R&B and rock and roll, Tarnopol had the singer record operatic ballads and easy listening material, pairing him with Dick Jacobs.

Jackie Wilson scored hits as he entered the 1960s With “Doggin’ Around”, “Night”, and “Baby Workout”, which he composed with The Midnighters member Alonzo Tucker. His songwriting alliance with Tucker also turned out other songs, including “No Pity (In The Naked City)” and “I’m So Lonely.” The songs Alone At Last” and “My Empty Arms” were also hits. In 1961, Wilson recorded a tribute album to Al Jolson, Nowstalgia … You Ain’t Heard Nothin’ Yet, sadly The album was a commercial failure. Following the success of “Baby Workout”, Wilson experienced a lull in his career between 1964 and 1966 as Tarnopol and Brunswick Records released a succession of unsuccessful albums and singles. Despite the lack of sales success, Wilson still made artistic gains as he recorded an album with Count Basie, as well as a series of duets with R & B artist LaVern Baker and gospel singer Linda Hopkins.

In 1966, Jackie Wilson released the songs “Whispers (Gettin’ Louder)”, “(Your Love Keeps Lifting Me) Higher and Higher”, “I Get the Sweetest Feeling”, which has sincespawned numerous cover versions by other artists such as Edwin Starr, Will Young, Erma Franklin (Aretha Franklin’s sister) and Liz McClarnon.A key to Jackie Wilson’s musical rebirth was recording with legendary Detroit musicians normally employed by Motown Records, plus Other Chicago-based session players and The Detroit based Funk Brothers. By 1975, Wilson and the Chi-Lites were the only significant artists left on Brunswick’s roster. Wilson had continued to record singles that found success on the R&B chart, but found no significant pop chart success. His final hit, “You Got Me Walkin'”, written by Eugene Record of the Chi-Lites, was released in 1972 with the Chi-Lites backing him on vocals and instruments.

Sadly On September 29, 1975, suffered a massive heart attack and collapsed on stage, while performing “Lonely Teardrops” on Dick Clark’s Good Ol’ Rock and Roll Revue, hosted by the Latin Casino in Cherry Hill, New Jersey. Cornell Gunter of the Coasters, who was backstage, noticed Wilson was not breathing. Gunter was able to resuscitate him and Wilson was then rushed to a nearby hospital. Medical personnel worked to stabilize Wilson’s vital signs, but the lack of oxygen to his brain caused him to slip into a coma. He briefly recovered in early 1976, and was even able to take a few wobbly steps. Sadly he slipped back into a semi-comatose state. Wilson was deemed conscious but incapacitated in early June 1976, unable to speak but aware of his surroundings. Wilson was a resident of the Medford Leas Retirement Center in Medford, New Jersey, when he was admitted into Memorial Hospital of Burlington County in Mount Holly, New Jersey. He was initially buried in an unmarked grave at Westlawn Cemetery near Detroit. However In 1987, a fundraiser by a Detroit radio station collected enough money to purchase a headstone.

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Jam Master Jay (Run DMC)

Jam Master Jay. The American Disc Jockey with hip-hop group Run DMC was born 21st January 1965. Run–D.M.C. were an American hip hop group from Hollis, Queens, New York, founded in 1981 by Joseph “Run” Simmons, Darryl “D.M.C.” McDaniels, and Jason “Jam Master Jay” Mizell. The group is widely acknowledged as one of the most influential acts in the history of hip hop culture. Run–D.M.C. was one of the most well-known hip hop acts in the 1980s who, along with LL Cool J, The Beastie Boys, and Public Enemy signified the advent of the new school of hip hop music. They were the first group in the genre to have a gold album (Run–D.M.C., 1984) and be nominated for a Grammy Award. They were the first to earn a platinum record (King of Rock, 1985), the first to earn a multiplatinum certification (Raising Hell, 1986) the first to have videos on MTV, the first to appear on American Bandstand and the cover of Rolling Stone.

The group was among the first to highlight the importance of the MC and DJ relationship. In 2004, Rolling Stone ranked them number 48 in their list of the greatest musical artists of all time. In 2007, Run–D.M.C. was named “The Greatest Hip Hop Group of All Time” by MTV.com and “Greatest Hip Hop Artist of All Time” by VH1. On April 4, 2009, rapper Eminem inducted them into the Rock and Roll Hall of Fame. In doing so, Run–D.M.C. became only the second hip hop group in history to be inducted, after Grandmaster Flash and the Furious Five. The initials “D.M.C.” are widely accepted to refer to Darryl McDaniels’ initials. In the 1985 album King of Rock’s title track, McDaniels says the initials have two meanings: “Devastating Mic Control” and “D for never dirty, MC for mostly clean.” He also makes a third reference “The ‘D’s for Doing it all of the time, the ‘M’s for the rhymes that all are Mine, The ‘C’s for Cool – cool as can be.”

Paul Stanley (Kiss)

Paul Stanley, the Vocalist and guitarist with hard rock band Kiss was born 20th January 1952. Kiss were Formed in New York City in January 1973 and rose to prominence in the mid to late 1970s on the basis of the members’ white and black face paint and flamboyant stage outfits and elaborate live performances, which featured fire breathing, blood spitting, smoking guitars, shooting rockets, The 1973–’80 original lineup of Paul Stanley (vocals and rhythm guitar), Gene Simmons (vocals and bass guitar), Ace Frehley (lead guitar) and Peter Criss (drums) is the most successful. With their makeup and costumes, they took on the personas of comic book-style characters: Starchild (Stanley), The Demon (Simmons), Spaceman or Space Ace (Frehley) and Catman (Criss) and the performances included levitating drum kits and pyrotechnics.

The band explains that the fans were the ones who ultimately chose their makeup designs. Stanley became the “Starchild” because of his tendency to be referred to as the “starry-eyed lover” and “hopeless romantic”. The “Demon” makeup reflected Simmons’ cynicism and dark sense of humor, as well as his affection for comic books. Frehley’s “Spaceman” makeup was a reflection of his fondness for science fiction and supposedly being from another planet. Criss’ “Catman” makeup was in accordance with the belief that he had nine lives because of his rough childhood in Brooklyn. Because of creative differences, both Criss and Frehley had Left the group by 1982. The band’s commercial fortunes had waned considerably by that point.

However Buoyed by a wave of Kiss nostalgia in the 1990s, the band announced a reunion of the original lineup in 1996. The resulting Kiss Alive/Worldwide/ Reunion Tour was the top-grossing act of 1996 and 1997. Criss and Frehley have since left Kiss again, but the band continues with Eric Singer and Tommy Thayer. Stanley and Simmons have remained the only two constant members. Kiss have also been named in many “Top” lists. They include Number 10 on VH1′s ’100 Greatest Artists of Hard Rock’,9th on ‘The Greatest Metal Bands’ list by MTV, number one on Hit Paraders’s “Top 100 Live Bands”, 56th on VH1′s “100 Greatest Artists Of All Time”, and 26th on Gibson’s “50 Greatest American Rock Bands” and Counting the 1978 solo albums, Kiss has been awarded 28 gold albums to date, and have sold more than 40 million albums in the United States, of which 20 million have been certified by the RIAA and their worldwide sales exceeds 100 million albums.

Robert Palmer

Award-winning English singer-songwriter Robert Palmer was born 19 January, 1949 in Batley, Yorkshire. He was known for his distinctive voice and the eclectic mix of musical styles on his albums, combining soul, jazz, rock, pop, reggae and blues. He found success both in his solo career and in the musical act Power Station, and had Top 10 songs in both the US and the UK. His iconic music videos by Terence Donovan for the hits “Simply Irresistible” and “Addicted to Love”, featured identically dressed dancing women with pale faces, dark eye makeup and bright red lipstick, which resembled the women in the art of Patrick Nagel, an artist popular in the 1980s. Sharp-suited, his involvement in the music industry commenced in the 1960s, covered five decades and included a spell with Vinegar Joe.

He released his first album “Pressure Drop” in 1975, which infused with his interests in reggae and rock music. In 1978, he released Double Fun, a collection of Caribbean-influenced rock. Palmer’s next album was an artistic departure, concentrating on pure rock, 1979′s Secrets produced his second Top 20 single “Bad Case of Loving You (Doctor, Doctor)”.The 1980s saw Palmer find an increasing amount of commercial success with his next album Clues, which contained the synth pop stylings of New Wave and gave him much needed exposure to a younger audience. The album contained the singles “Looking for Clues” and “Some Guys Have All the Luck”. In April 1983 Pride was released, which not as commercially successful as Clues did feature the title song and Palmer’s cover of The System’s “You Are In My System”. later that year Palmer also performed at Duran Duran’s charity concert at Aston Villa football ground where he struck up friendships with members of Duran Duran which would spawn the supergroup Power Station, and The subsequent album spawned two hit singles “Some Like It Hot” and a cover of the T.Rex song “Get It On (Bang a Gong)”

In 1985 Palmer recorded the album Riptide which featured the single “Addicted to Love“. which has a memorable and much-parodied music video, directed by Terence Donovan, and In 1987, he won the Grammy Award for Best Male Rock Vocal Performance for “Addicted to Love”.The album also contained The singles “Hyperactive!” and his cover of Cherrelle’s “I Didn’t Mean to Turn You On”. In 1987 Palmer set up his own recording studio and released Heavy Nova in 1988, Palmer again returned to experimenting, this time with bossa nova rhythms, heavy rock and white-soul balladeering.

He repeated his previous success of “Addicted to Love” with the video of “Simply Irresistible“, again with a troupe of female “musicians”. The ballad “She Makes My Day” also proved to be a hit in the UK. In 1989, he won a second Grammy for “Simply Irresistible” which would later be featured in the Tony Award winning musical Contact. Rolling Stone magazine voted Palmer the best-dressed rock star for 1990. The same year Palmer expanded his range even further for his next album, Don’t Explain, which featured the Bob Dylan penned single “I’ll Be Your Baby Tonight”, in a collaboration with UB40. Marvin Gaye cover “Mercy Mercy Me”. Throughout the 1990s, Palmer ventured further into diverse material and his 1992 album Ridin’ High was a tribute to the Tin Pan Alley era. Sadly Palmer, who was a heavy smoker, died in Paris, France, from a heart attack on 26 September 2003 at the age of 54. He was survived by his parents, Leslie and Anna Palmer, his girlfriend Geraldine Edwards, his brother, Mark Palmer, and his children, James, Jane, Anthony, Anna and Martin.

Dolly Parton

Often referred to as “The Queen of Country Music,” The American singer-songwriter, author, multi-instrumentalist, actress and philanthropist Dolly Parton was born January 19 in 1946. Aside from singing Country Music she has also appeared in many movies such as 9 to 5, The Best Little Whorehouse in Texas, Steel Magnolias and Straight Talk and is one of the most successful female country artists of all time.Dolly Parton was born in Sevierville, Tennessee, and began performing as a child, singing on local radio and television programs in the Eastern Tennessee area.

By age nine, she was appearing on The Cas Walker Show on both WIVK Radio and WBIR-TV in Knoxville, Tennessee. At thirteen, she recorded the single “Puppy Love”, on a small Louisiana label, Goldband Records, and appeared at the Grand Ole Opry in Nashville, Tennessee.It was at the Opry where she first met Johnny Cash who encouraged her to go where her heart took her, and not to care what others thought. The day after she graduated from high school in 1964, Parton moved to Nashville taking many traditional elements of folklore and popular music from East Tennessee with her. Parton’s initial success came as a songwriter, writing two top ten hits with her uncle Bill Owens: Bill Phillips’s “Put it Off Until Tomorrow” and Skeeter Davis’ 1967 hit “Fuel to the Flame”. She also wrote a minor chart hit for Hank Williams Jr during this period. She had signed with Monument Records in late 1965, where she was initially pitched as a bubblegum pop singer, earning only one national-chart single, “Happy, Happy Birthday Baby,” . The label agreed to let Parton sing country music after her composition, “Put It Off Until Tomorrow,” as recorded by Bill Phillips went to number six on the country music charts in 1966. Her first country single, “Dumb Blonde” reached number twenty-four on the country music charts in 1967, followed the same year with “Something Fishy,” which went to number seventeen. The two songs anchored her first full-length album, Hello, I’m Dolly.

In 1967, country entertainer Porter Wagoner invited Parton to join his organization, offering her a regular spot on his weekly syndicated television program The Porter Wagoner Show. He encouraged Dolly to sign to his label, RCA Victor. RCA released her first single as a duet with Wagoner. That song, “The Last Thing on My Mind,” was released in late 1967, reached the country top ten in January 1968, launching a six-year streak of virtually uninterrupted top ten singles for the pair. Parton’s first solo single for RCA, “Just Because I’m a Woman,” was released in 1968 and was a moderate chart hit. For the remainder of the decade, none of her solo efforts were as successful as her duets with Wagoner. The duo were named Vocal Group of the Year in 1968 by the Country Music Association. in February 1971,

For the next two years, she had a number of solo hits including her first number-one single, “Joshua.” and her signature song “Coat of Many Colors”, in addition to her duets she had successful singles, including “Jolene”. which was eleased in 1973 and topped the singles chart in February 1974, reaching No. 7 in the UK in 1976. From 1974 to 1980, she consistently charted in the country Top 10, with no fewer than eight singles reaching number one, and she also had her own syndicated-television variety show, Dolly! (1976–1977). It was also during this period that Parton began to embark on a high profile crossover campaign, attempting to aim her music in a more mainstream direction outside country music.

In Her 1976 album All I Can Do, Parton began taking more of an active role in production, and began specifically aiming her music in a more mainstream, pop direction. Her first entirely self-produced effort, 1977′s New Harvest … First Gathering, highlighted Parton’s pop sensibilities and contained covers of the pop and R&B classics “My Girl” and “Higher and Higher”. In 1978 Parton won a Grammy Award for Best Female Country Vocal Performance for her Here You Come Again album. She continued to have hits with “Heartbreaker” (1978), “Baby I’m Burning” and “You’re the Only One” (both 1979), all of which charted in the pop singles Top 40, and all of which also topped the country-singles chart.

Parton’s commercial success continued to grow during 1980, with three number-one hits in a row: the Donna Summer-written “Starting Over Again”, “Old Flames Can’t Hold a Candle to You”, and “9 to 5,” which topped the country and pop charts in early 1981 and was the theme song to the feature film Nine to Five (1980) in which Parton starred alongside Jane Fonda and Lily Tomlin. Parton’s singles continued to appear consistently in the country Top 10 between 1981 and 1985. She also explored new business and entertainment ventures such as her Dollywood theme park, that opened in 1986 in Pigeon Forge, Tennessee. By the mid-1980s, her record sales were still relatively strong, in 1987 she released the album Trio (1987) to critical acclaim. The album spent five weeks at number one on Billboard’s Country Albumschart. Throughout the 1980′s 90′s and 2000 ownwards Dolly has continue to enjoy ongoing success.

As well as her Successful Business Ventures, such as Dollywood, her many televison and film appearances and her varied charity work, she has also won many awards and honours, including eight Grammy Awards and a total of 45 Grammy Award nominations, At the 2011 Grammies she was given a Lifetime Achievement Award and at the American Music Awards she has won three awards, At the Country Music Association, she has received 10 awards and At the Academy of Country Music, she won seven awards and is one of only six female artists (including Reba McEntire, Barbara Mandrell, Shania Twain, Loretta Lynn, and Taylor Swift), to win the Country Music Association’s highest honor, Entertainer of the Year.

She has also been nominated for two Academy Awards and a Tony Award. She was also awarded a star on the Hollywood Walk of Fame for Recording in 1984. Dolly wasalso inducted into the Grand Ole Opry in 1969, and in 1986 was named one of Ms. Magazine’s Women of the Year. In 1999, Parton received country music’s highest honor, an induction into the Country Music Hall of Fame. She received an honorary doctorate degree from Carson-Newman College (Jefferson City, Tennessee) in 1990. This was followed by induction into the National Academy of Popular Music/Songwriters Hall of Fame in 2001. In 2002, Parton ranked number four in CMT’s 40 Greatest Women of Country Music. On December 3, 2006, Parton received the Kennedy Center Honors from the John F. Kennedy Center for the Performing Arts for her lifetime of contributions to the arts. On November 16, 2010, Parton accepted the Liseberg Applause Award, the theme park industry’s most prestigious honor, on behalf of Dollywood theme park during a ceremony held at IAAPA Attractions Expo 2010 in Orlando.

She is also a keen conservationist and In 2003, her efforts to preserve the bald eagle through the American Eagle Foundation’s sanctuary at Dollywood earned her the Partnership Award from the U.S. Fish and Wildlife Service and Parton also received the Woodrow Wilson Award for Public Service from the Woodrow Wilson International Center for Scholars of the Smithsonian Institution at a ceremony in Nashville on November 8, 2007. For her work in literacy, Parton has received various other awards including: Association of American Publishers – AAP Honors Award in 2000, Good Housekeeping Seal of Approval in 2001, American Association of School Administrators – Galaxy Award in 2002, National State Teachers of the Year – Chasing Rainbows Award in 2002 and the Parents as Teachers National Center – Child and Family Advocacy Award in 2003.

Glen Frey (Eagles)

Glenn Frey, singer with American rock band The Eagles sadly passed away 18 January 2016. Formed in Los Angeles, California in 1971 by Glenn Frey, Don Henley, Bernie Leadon, and Randy Meisner, The Eagles have seven number one singles, six Grammys, five American Music Awards, and six number one albums, the Eagles were one of the most successful musical acts of the 1970s. At the end of the 20th century, two of their albums, Their Greatest Hits (1971–1975) and Hotel California, ranked among the 20 best-selling albums in the U.S. according to the Recording Industry Association of America. Hotel California is ranked 37th in Rolling Stone’s 500 Greatest Albums of All Time, and the band was ranked No. 75 on the magazine’s 2004 list of the 100 Greatest Artists of All Time.They have the best-selling album in the U.S. with Their Greatest Hits (1971–1975), which sold approximately 42 million copies worldwide. They have sold over 120 million albums worldwide, and 100 million in the U.S. alone. They are the fifth-highest-selling music act and highest-selling American band in U.S. history. No other American band sold more records than the Eagles during the 1970s.The Eagles released their self-titled debut album in 1972 which spawned three Top 40 singles, “Take It Easy”, “Witchy Woman”, and “Peaceful Easy Feeling”.

 

They followed up the success of their debut album with Desperado in 1973. The album was less successful than the first, reaching only No. 41 on the charts and neither of its two singles reached the Top 40. However, the album contained two of the band’s most popular tracks, “Desperado” and “Tequila Sunrise”. They released On the Border in 1974 and added guitarist Don Felder midway through the recording of the album. The album generated two Top 40 singles: “Already Gone” and their first Number One, “Best of My Love”.It was not until 1975′s One of These Nights that the Eagles became America’s biggest band. The album released three Top 10 singles: “One of These Nights”, “Lyin’ Eyes”, and “Take It to the Limit”. They continued with that success in late 1976 with the release of Hotel California, which would go on to sell over 16 million copies in the U.S. alone. The album yielded three Top 20 singles, “New Kid in Town”, “Hotel California”, and “Life in the Fast Lane”.They released their last studio album for nearly 28 years in 1979 with The Long Run, which spawned three Top 10 singles: “Heartache Tonight”, “The Long Run”, and “I Can’t Tell You Why”.

The Eagles disbanded in July 1980 but reunited in 1994 for Hell Freezes Over, a mix of live and new studio tracks. They have toured intermittently since then and were inducted into the Rock and Roll Hall of Fame in 1998. In 2007, the Eagles released Long Road Out of Eden, their first full studio album in 28 years. The album would top the album charts, release five singles on the Adult Contemporary Charts and win the band two Grammys. The next year they launched the Long Road Out of Eden Tour in support of the album. The band members have discussed the possibility of making another album.

Richard Archer (Hard Fi)

Richard Archer, British singer and guitarist with English indie rock band (Hard-Fi was Born 18th January 1977. Archer’s first band Contempo were formed in Staines-upon-Thames during the summer of 1997, originally going by the name “Parachute”. Mick Jones produced demos that were intended to be released as an album in 2000 but whose release was delayed and eventually cancelled. Some of these tracks have been reworked as Hard-Fi songs. Contempo’s first release was a limited 7″ vinyl on the Blue Dog label with the tracks “On The Floor” and “Stronger” (the latter also released as a b-side for the Hard-Fi single Hard to Beat). In November 2000 Contempo announced they had left London Records. Contempo thenreleased a six track EP called “This Is Contempo”, which featured the ska song “Ain’t Going Out Tonight” on their own label “Nu-Suburban Sounds”. Another album, “Contempo – The Demos”, was a bootleg CD featuring demos of what would become Hard-Fi tracks: “Better Do Better”, “Can’t Get Along (Without You)”, “Living for the Weekend”, “Move On Now” and “Unnecessary Trouble”.

Hard Fi were Formed in Staines, Surrey in 2003. The band’s members are Richard Archer (lead vocals and guitar), Ross Phillips (guitar and backing vocals), Kai Stephens (bass guitar and backing vocals) and Steve Kemp (drums and backing vocals). Hard Fi achieved chart success with their third single, “Hard to Beat” and then followed by other successful singles such as “Cash Machine” and “Living for the Weekend”, which all reached top 15 in the UK Singles Chart. Their debut album STARS OF CCTV was released on 4 July 2005, and although receiving critical acclaim (NME called it the Album of the Year and it was nominated for the Mercury Prize and two Brit Awards; Best British Group and Best British Rock Act), it didn’t reach No. 1 in the UK albums chart until six months later on 22 January 2006. It originally entered the charts at number 6.

The band’s second album Once Upon a Time in the West was released on 3 September 2007 and reached number 1 in its first week. Their third album Killer Sounds, which features the singles “Good for Nothing”, “Fire in the House” and “Bring It On”, was released on 19 August 2011 and debuted at number 9 on the UK Album Chart. Although Hard-Fi are generally considered part of the indie rock scene, they have stated that they are also heavily influenced by soul and dance music.